FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| John Huston |||
John Huston

Over the span of his impressive career director John Huston created one of the most distinctive signatures in the history of the movies without limiting the incredible range of his subject or choice of genre.

At first it's hard to believe that macho director John Huston could be responsible or such a sweet and touching story of a Novitiate nun (Deborah Kerr) and a Marine (Robert Mitchum) dependant on one another as they hide from the Japanese on a Pacific island, but for those familiar with "The African Queen" it isn't hard to see his influence on the strong yet subtle impressive performance he draws from Mitchum and the ever present excitement he creates in this WWII drama. In Widescreen!

Only a director as abundantly macho as John Huston could so adeptly handle such testosterone laden stars Sean Connery and Michael Caine in this rousing Rudyard Kipling adventure set in 1800s India. Huston masterfully balances the fun of male camaraderie with constant imminent danger as the two soldiers attempt to dupe a remote village of their gold by passing off Connery as a god, and in the process produces a Kipling adventure to rival "Gunga Din". Widescreen

Huston co-wrote this gritty and trend-setting drama about a gang of small-time crooks who plan and execute the "perfect crime". This is the grand daddy of caper films executed with a firm expert hand that unflinchingly guides the raw performances (including Marilyn Monroe in her first role) of these dark and ill-fated characters.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

Advertisement

Everyone's Hero

By BrianOrndorf

September 15th, 2006

Who really knows just how much Christopher Reeve contributed to his “directorial” effort, “Everyone’s Hero,” but his stamp of optimism is all over this CG family flick. It looks cheap, is somewhat annoying, and grows increasingly moronic as it goes, but it isn’t as appalling as it looks, due to good voice work and an upbeat tempo that is pleasant.

Everyone's Hero

Yankee Irving (voiced by Jake T. Austin) is a pipsqueak kid trying to find his place in the neighborhood baseball games. Defeated by lack of size and strength, Yankee finds a confidant in Screwie, a hot tempered talking baseball (Rob Reiner) who just wants to be left in the sandlot where he was found. When Yankee learns that Babe Ruth’s cherished bat Darlin' (Whoopi Goldberg) has been stolen on the eve of the World Series by a shady pitcher named Lefty (William H. Macy), the boy begins a cross-country adventure to retrieve it and save the day.

Christopher Reeve’s credit as director of “Everyone’s Hero” is placed prominently at the end of the film. It’s difficult to find out just how much work Reeve did on the picture before his death two years ago, but the credit is a curious button on a very strange CG animated film.

Regardless of his involvement in the actual day-to-day work of the movie, Reeve’s spirit is all over this creation. “Hero” tells an inspiring tale of triumph over personal doubt, but it does so in excruciatingly rudimentary ways, still maintaining a cheery mood throughout. Clearly this is a not a glossy production, lacking a budget to polish the crude visuals, and follows a story that would have a bigger impact on the direct-to-video circuit, where kids can sit in the path of the message cannon without their parents growing irritated that they spent $40 to spend their Saturday afternoon with mediocrity.

Because the production doesn’t have the coin to spend, they make up for it with a host of celebrity voices that go a long way to hiding the overall lethargy in the scripting. While Reeve’s great friend Robin Williams is lost in a character without comedic payoff (the Chicago Cubs owner who wants the bat stolen), and Rob Reiner is swallowed by his growing volume, it’s Whoopi Goldberg who scores softly as Babe Ruth’s cherished bat. Yes, I just wrote that: Whoopi Goldberg is one of the best elements of the movie. Backing away from her dated, tired, and lazy sassmouth routine, Goldberg puts on her best southern charms and has fun with the role.

“Hero” has some respectable adventuresome moments. A train chase where Yankee is dashing to escape the clutches of Lefty provides a modest spark to the animation. I also enjoyed how the directors (Colin Brady and Dan St. Pierre are also credited) had fun with the idea of talking bats and baseballs, along with their limitations of movement. Because “Hero” gets sludgy with inspiration, it’s the little moments, which break free of formula, that count.

Set in a pre-Depression era world, “Hero” plays pretty fast and loose with the period details. I’m not sure why the production even bothered to undertake this era when the script is peppered with characters doing the “Cabbage Patch” dance, or making a Starbucks reference. Even by the liquid standards of a family film, this kind of screenwriting and improv looks desperate, and while it doesn’t exactly ruin the film, it ultimately allows the cringes to outpace the smiles.

My rating: C