FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Rob Reiner |||
Rob Reiner

Son of comic genius Carl Reiner, Rob Reiner has picked up the family torch and directed some of the most memorable, quotable, and endearing comedies of the last two decades, and he’s no schmuck when it comes to dramas either.

This is a hilarious spoof filled with biting satire about a filmmaker making a documentary (or “rockumentary” if you will) about a once famous raucous British heavy metal band on a disastrous U.S concert tour, featuring the magnificent talents of co-stars/co-scripters Christopher Guest, Michael McKean and Harry Shearer. This granddaddy of the mocumentary speaks to the hard rockin’, air guitar playing 14-year-old boy in us all.

In this low-key sleeper hit based on a Stephen King story four young boys in 1959 Oregon set out on a camping trip in order to see a dead body one of them accidentally found. This is a loving memoir to a simpler time with an exceptionally talented young cast tentatively taking the steps on a road that leads to maturity.

Reiner turns a wry, even caustic, eye on men and women in friendship and in love, and that gray area in between. This is an engaging and smartly performed comedy about a pair of longtime platonic friends who turn a feud into a lasting friendship, determined not to let sex mess up a great relationship, until love threatens to ruin everything.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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Brick

By BrianOrndorf

March 30th, 2006

The quest to try something different propels the ambition behind “Brick,” but not the film itself. A flaccid ode to film noir, the picture just doesn’t fire on enough engines to keep itself breathing, soon crumbling under the weight of its pretentious screenwriting and monotonous performances.


Brendan Frye (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) has discovered the dead body of his ex-girlfriend. Looking to uncover what happened to her, he hides the body and starts a hunt for clues. Combing the underbelly of his high school, Brendan finds himself in deep with femme fatales, teachers, vamps, stoners, and crime figures who all want to thwart his investigation. Brendan, with nothing to lose, will stop at nothing to find his answers.

The gimmick found in Rian Johnson’s “Brick” is transplanting the hard-boiled film noir genre of the 1940s to the modern day high school. Admittedly, it’s a neat idea, but the ingenuity found in “Brick” in constipated by a lack of directorial confidence, and frankly, a decent budget to match its lofty ambitions.

“Brick” is a moody little film, punctuated with bursts of goofy violence. Mostly though, it’s a deliberately paced picture looking to pay homage to the great detective fiction (Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler) and cinema of yesteryear with its own variety of slang and settings. One of the more controversial elements of the film has to be Johnson’s screenplay, which invents its own sticky wordplay to spice up the drama. Think of Fenster from “Usual Suspects” if he had a 3rd period chemistry class, and that’s getting close to Johnson’s design. Meant to put a distinctive stamp on the film, the dialog grows increasingly tedious and manufactured, especially when the locations don’t match the same sense of fantasy. The cast can spit the words out with minimal hiccups, but the lines feel meaningless dropping off their heavy tongues, and everything sounds clouded under the heavy blanket of the picture’s uneven sound recording.

Johnson is never able to transcend the high school gimmick either. The director fails to make the school a character in the film, instead keeping it as a dull gray background to Brendan’s “Veronica Mars” brand of journey, and only includes one faculty member (Richard Roundtree), a character he does nothing interesting with.

Joseph Gordon-Levitt is certainly an intense actor (“Mysterious Skin”), but here as Brendan, the actor is too insular, giving Johnson little to work with. Gordon-Levitt is intended to be the Jake Gittes of the film, stumbling around, falling into beatings and trouble with every passing hour. Johnson can’t find the core to Brendan, discouraging the audience from curiosity about his thought process. Perhaps the whole film is miscast, teeming with young actors (Meagan Good, Nora Zehetner) who clearly didn’t do their Bogart/Bacall homework beforehand, and a crime boss called “The Pin” played by Lukas Haas. I can’t think of a single actor with less screen menace than Lukas Haas, who drifts through the film looking ridiculous trying to channel his inner pimp.

“Brick” certainly wins points for trying to create something interesting with old recipes, and when Johnson lets the fists fly there’s a kooky spark to his scenes of brawling. Johnson’s vision is simply lacking a pulse, and when “Brick” finally heats up to a finale, it’s already deflated and finished.

My rating: C-