FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Alfred Hitchcock |||
Alfred Hitchcock

This is perhaps an obvious choice, however, most people tend to overlook the Master of Suspense’s early work as well as the relevancy of his last film as a key element in the continuing transition and development of the genre he defined.

One of Hitchcock's early triumphs, this predecessor to the mistaken identity man on the run scenario Hitchcock turned to time and again, stars Robert Donat as the innocent wrongly accused of murder and pursued by both the police and enemy spies. This is the first example of Hitchcock’s mastery over the suspense tale, giving us a glimpse of the greatness to come.

Considered to be one of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest works, this story of two men who meet by chance on a train and frivolously discuss swapping murders is a prime example of a common Hitchcock theme of the man who suddenly finds himself within a nightmare world over which he has no control. You can easily see how this film lays the ground work for the more popular “North by Northwest”.

Alfred Hitchcock's final film is a light-hearted thriller involving phony psychics, kidnappers and organized religion, all of which cross paths in the search for a missing heir and a fortune in jewels. Here, Hitchcock has brilliantly developed his signature form to include the now common, and often overused, device of plot twist, after plot twist, after plot twist. Widescreen!

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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Ultraviolet (BrianOrndorf)

By BrianOrndorf

March 3rd, 2006

Gathering dust on the Screen Gems shelf for over a year now, “Ultraviolet” is finally unleashed without screening for critics (a Screen Gems policy) and hiding behind an obnoxiously assaulting and unrevealing ad campaign.


It shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone that the film is a mess of bombastic direction and paint-by-numbers screenwriting, effectively killing the good will director Kurt Wimmer created with his Gun-Kata epic, “Equilibrium.”

In the future, a subculture of genetically modified humans with vampire hunger, known as Hemophages, have been forced underground due to a worldwide panic. The government, at a loss on how to defeat the bothersome and infectious horde, sends a lab experiment in the guise of a 10 year-old boy (the expressionless Cameron Bright, “Running Scared”) to the Hemophages to make trouble. Dispatched to thwart disaster is Violet (Milla Jovovich), a fierce Hemophage warrior who uses all her brutal skills and dynamic gifts to prevent her people from being eradicated, but finds herself protecting the child from certain doom instead.

It’s well known that writer/director Kurt Wimmer hates movie critics. “Ultraviolet” is the reason why.

“Ultraviolet” opens with a title sequence made up of comic book covers, all showcasing the exploits of our heroine. This is Wimmer’s indelicate way of announcing to the audience to leave all reality behind and embrace the superhero world. The next stage of transformation is found in the film’s cinematography, which emphasizes broad colors and smoothed out facial features to replicate the comic page. It’s an ambitious idea to tinker with the image in such a direct way (think “Sin City” without the budget), and it’s the first and last moment of true inspiration to be found in the film.

Wimmer’s previous movie was the cult hit, “Equilibrium.” Another sophisticated project, Wimmer’s vision for his “Fahrenheit 451” homage was simpler, thus making his shrewd direction all the more powerful. The picture also introduced the world to Gun-Kata: Wimmer’s particular brew of martial art. “Equilibrium” demonstrated Wimmer’s craving to mix-up the look and movement of action sequences, taking them to highly stylized realms of ass-kickery. “Ultraviolet” is Wimmer trying to reach that next level of visual elasticity, but forgetting to apply any self-control to the production.

With a heavy, often embarrassing use of CG, green-screen, and stiff fight choreography, Wimmer imagines a world for “Ultraviolet” where armies can be dropped with one swoosh of a sword, and the laws of gravity are mere suggestions to our hero. Trouble is, the fight sequences are so alarmingly repetitive, there’s little reason to root for Violet. Wimmer keeps going back to the well of the title character entering a room filled with bad guys, killing everybody with whatever random weapon she dreams up, and then changing outfits like a mood ring on her way out the door. The first time it’s fun, but Wimmer doesn’t know when to quit, and keeps trudging out the same blueprint to his action, only separated by what tricked out convention center or airport lobby the production managed to film in that day.

Also baffling is the set design. A mix of Anime influences and familiar futuristic trimmings, the sets in “Ultraviolet” look more like Studio 54 leftovers, with a touch of Hype Williams arrogance and Sci-Fi Channel tackiness tossed in for good measure. And Wimmer makes sure all the costumes match the colors of these sets, further amping the unintentional hilarity of the combat set-pieces, which come dangerously close to looking like an incredibly expensive deodorant commercial.

It comes to a point where “Ultraviolet” doesn’t know what kind of film it wants to be. Wimmer throws in some weepy emotional content in the relationship between Violet and the boy, but it’s melodramatic in all the wrong ways, and kills the little flow the picture has. Wimmer soon shrugs and gives himself over to complete camp by the end, which features Violet dueling with the villain using flaming swords. Meant to shake action conventions, it looks more like a Hawaiian luau gone horribly awry.

Kurt Wimmer certainly is a distinctive visionary, but if “Ultraviolet” demonstrates anything it would be that his farthest reaches of imagination might not always translate properly to the big screen.

My rating: D+