FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Alfred Hitchcock |||
Alfred Hitchcock

This is perhaps an obvious choice, however, most people tend to overlook the Master of Suspenseís early work as well as the relevancy of his last film as a key element in the continuing transition and development of the genre he defined.

One of Hitchcock's early triumphs, this predecessor to the mistaken identity man on the run scenario Hitchcock turned to time and again, stars Robert Donat as the innocent wrongly accused of murder and pursued by both the police and enemy spies. This is the first example of Hitchcockís mastery over the suspense tale, giving us a glimpse of the greatness to come.

Considered to be one of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest works, this story of two men who meet by chance on a train and frivolously discuss swapping murders is a prime example of a common Hitchcock theme of the man who suddenly finds himself within a nightmare world over which he has no control. You can easily see how this film lays the ground work for the more popular ďNorth by NorthwestĒ.

Alfred Hitchcock's final film is a light-hearted thriller involving phony psychics, kidnappers and organized religion, all of which cross paths in the search for a missing heir and a fortune in jewels. Here, Hitchcock has brilliantly developed his signature form to include the now common, and often overused, device of plot twist, after plot twist, after plot twist. Widescreen!

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Born into Brothels

By CassyHavens

October 8th, 2005

First time I heard about this movie was when it won the Oscar for Best Documentary. Itís not the kind of movie that would be easy to market to a wide audience; thereís a lot in the film that is hard to watch, and a lot that really makes you think twice about the world. Living in the brothels of the red light district of Calcutta, Zana Briski and Ross Kauffman have created a powerful movie about children in adverse situations, achieving their dreams through art, and hope.


The real stars of this film are, of course, the children who live in the brothels. These arenít perfect children, and the filmmakers donít attempt to paint them as saints. They have faults, they have weaknesses, and they are each unique in their own ways. Each of them wants a better life. Itís as simple as that.

There isnít a lot that I can say about the film that hasnít already been said by people much more articulate than me. Itís uplifting, itís funny, itís heartbreaking, itís moving.

While it appears like there are a lot of special features, theyíre pretty brief. There is a small segment, "Reconnecting," which meets up with the kids 3 years later. Much too short, maybe only 5 minutes. There are 7 sets of deleted scenes, including one entire kid that they mostly cut from the film. These were good cuts, the scenes were not necessary, and some just reiterated what had already been presented in the film.

There are about 19 behind the scenes photos by Zana, Ross, and some of the kids. Notably missing are the childrenís actual photographs. I thought that would be a no-brainer, but apparently not. Thereís a small blurb about Kids with Cameras, and also the Academy Award acceptance clip. A brief interview with Charlie Rose after the Oscar win, the trailer, and a few other trailers.

I saved the best for last. The two commentaries I had to wait a while to watch them; you can only watch the same movie so many times in one day. The directorís commentary with Zana and Ross was fairly run-of-the-mill, with some nice insight on things you already know or guessed. You can really see how much they loved Kochi though, and you canít watch the film without falling in love with the little sweetheart. Their honest remarks about the children show that they really do care about them, and embrace their shortcomings.

The second commentary is video footage of the children watching select scenes from the film several years later. For most of it, they tease each other playfully, but when a serious scene comes on, they instantly become quiet, and remind each other that itís all in the past, theyíre so much better now. They way these children interact with each other is like that of a close-knit family; theyíve seen each other at their worst, and their best. These kids that have been given the fuzzy end of the lollypop in life, they show us that nobody should ever give up, that no situation is so dire that there is no escape from it.

My rating: B+