FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| David Lean |||
David Lean

Honored with the American Film Institute Life Achievement Award in 1990, Lean’s body of work (ranging from the intimate film to the grandiose epic) demonstrates an obsessive cultivation of craft and a fastidious concern with detail that has become the very definition of quality British cinema.

Adapted from Noel Coward’s one-act play, Lean takes a potentially boring story of middle-age flirtation and tenderly creates one of the most enduring and poignant romance films ever made. Brilliantly underplayed, two happily married strangers meet by chance in a railway station and fall desperately in love, but never physically express the undercurrent of passion that exists between them, even during their final gut wrenching separation – if your heart doesn’t ache, you’re just not human!

Demonstrating moments of intimacy through gigantic display, Lean sets up the greatness of Pip’s expectations with the magnitude of his frightful encounters; one with an escaped convict, whose emerge into the frame reminds us what it’s like to be a child in a world of oversized, menacing adults, and another with the meeting of mad Miss Havisham, in all her gothic splendor.

Peter O'Toole made an enigmatic and lasting impression in his debut role as British officer T.E. Lawrence, who helped Arab rebels fight the Turks in WWI, and Omar Sharif has perhaps the greatest cinematic intro of all time as he magically appears through the ghostly waves of the desert heat, achieving Lean’s compulsive drive to create the perfectly composed shot. Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Jose Ferrer, and Claude Rains round out this incredibly talented and magnetically charged cast.

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Roll Bounce

By BrianOrndorf

September 22nd, 2005

Bringing back roller-skating is no easy task, and “Roll Bounce” gets it half right. When focusing on the skates, the picture is a charmer, recalling the sweet neon-and-polyester glow of the 1970s. When director Malcolm D. Lee tries to shove drama into the film, “Bounce” dies quickly, needlessly weighing down the fun with lazy screenwriting.


The year is 1978, and Xavier (Bow Wow) and his friends are mourning the loss of the neighborhood roller rink. Searching for greener pastures, the boys bus themselves over to Sweetwater, the big city rink that hosts the roller-skating champion, Sweetness (superbly played by Wesley Jonathan). Dealing with potential girlfriends (Meagan Good), his stern father (Chi McBride), and grief for his dead mother, Xavier finds even more headaches when he finds himself in competition with Sweetness for king of the rink, and the outlook doesn’t look good for the amateur skater.

When one thinks of the late 1970s, the thought of a smiling person, clad in polyester, and gliding around on roller skates has to be one of the preeminent images that comes to mind. Not since the one-two punch of 1979’s “Roller Boogie” and 1980’s “Xanadu” has roller-skating been more affectionately realized than in Malcolm D. Lee’s “Roll Bounce.”

“Bounce” is a cheerful film, gregariously attempting to capture that small moment in time when roller-skating was king, and served as the true barometer for coolness in adolescent lives. Lee (“The Best Man,” “Undercover Brother”), a child of the 70s, is thorough in his recreation of the era, and gives heavy screentime to observing the pop culture of the moment, found in the birth of Atari, “Star Wars” posters, old Pepsi cans, and afros. Lots of afros. Lee isn’t afraid to get silly with “Bounce,” encouraging his actors to go broad in the roller rink sequences, and bringing in Wayne Brady (as the rink D.J.) and Nick Cannon (as the roller-skate manager) to make sure the audience knows that the film is a comedy, regardless if they can’t generate a single laugh between them.

However, as much as Lee is trying to drink in the neon glow of idealized childhood, he’s also under the impression that he must engage the heart; one minute the games of snaps are flying furiously, and the next feature stark moments of Xavier trying to deal with his mother’s death. While the performances are solid, the contrast between the bipolar moods of “Bounce” is far too great for the film to support, and it constipates the pace of the film to routinely bounce back and forth between domestic drama and era-specific silliness. In his desperate quest to inject some audience-pleasing sympathy into the script, Lee frequently blocks the sheer fun of the project, which is the only element he has in his favor.

I’m also surprised that Lee didn’t take more care with his dialog. With a film that is straining to recreate the 1970s in every way, Lee allows his cast to speak as if the film were shot two weeks ago, with liberal use of modern slang and exclamation. It certainly snaps the mind out of the 1970s quickly, which appears to go against Lee’s intentions.

The highlights of the film are the skate sequences, and they’re handled well by the production. Backed by a predictable, but warmly recognizable funk, disco, and soft-rock soundtrack, “Bounce” is wonderful just watching the dancing and gliding on the rink. And while clearly the actors are being helped considerably on the skates, they sell the joy of the sport well, especially Bow Wow, who has never been this likable onscreen before. Lee’s fondness for the roller rink culture is infectious, and “Roll Bounce” only comes alive when Lee pays attention to the magic of the skates. It’s just a crime that Lee is too frightened to give himself over completely to the moment.

My rating: C