FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| John Ford |||
John Ford

One of the art form's grand masters of all time, Ford is responsible for influencing the seminal directors of generation after generation. Strongly associated with the impressive body of work created over a lifetime with collaborator John Wayne, it is nearly impossible to choose just three… but here it goes.

This powerful winner of the Best Picture Academy Award is set in Wales at the turn of the 19th century, and tells the story of a family of miners, whose lives are filled with danger and repression. The film is beautifully crafted, lovingly depicting the gut wrenching sacrifices and light-hearted moments that are elemental to family life, making this film a true representation of the craft that is unmistakably John Ford.

This film is told in flashback as James Stewart, after a long absence, returns home for the funeral of a friend who saved his life from a sadistic outlaw. This classic covers every essential element required to qualify as a western epic from unlikely friends to the girl who comes between them, to the enemy they both despise, but handle with extremely different approaches, to Fords signature cast of supporting characters, all combine to make this a staple for every fan of this uniquely American genre.

This romantic comedy seen through the eyes of John Ford has John Wayne ( an American-raised boxer) go to Ireland to the village of his birth, fall for feisty Maureen O'Hara, and fight with town ruffian Victor McLaglen in one of the all time classic screen brawls. This is an exceptionally fine romantic movie that with Ford’s capable bravado manages to be a film that any man’s man can openly enjoy.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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Underclassman

By BrianOrndorf

September 1st, 2005

There have been other Nick Cannon comedies in the past, but nothing sells his toxic charms quite like “Underclassman.” A lame and deeply unfunny action comedy, the film always wants to put Cannon front and center, which is the last place this untalented actor should be.


Tracy Stokes (Nick Cannon) is a second-generation cop, stuck on a lousy bike patrol detail. When the murder of a high school investigative journalist requires an undercover assignment to find the killer, Tracy pesters his captain (Cheech Marin) for the chance to prove himself. Sent to an elite private school, Tracy hunts for clues as he befriends the students (including Shawn Ashmore, “X2”), soon blurring the line between friend and suspect as he gets closer to solving the case.

“Underclassman” isn’t a movie; it’s a visual and aural test on how much Nick Cannon a person can possibly endure before they explode. A vanity production (Cannon produces and gets a story credit), “Underclassman” serves no higher purpose other than to show off Cannon’s comedic skills, which is like watching amateur night at small town coffee shop. To the person who once told Cannon he was funny, I wish I could jump into my DeLorean, travel back in time, and enthusiastically administer some Irish kisses to this individual.

Starting with a flat-out rip-off of the “Beverly Hills Cop” truck chase opener, “Underclassman” pretty much admits at the outset that actual storytelling isn’t what the experience is supposed to be about. Loosely built around a cop vs. crime plot, the picture quickly dissolves into a series of Cannon’s one-liners and profoundly unsettling reliance on hack facial gestures. Cannon has a quip for everything, revealing that director Marco Siega (“Pretty Persuasion”) had no control over his film and simply allowed Cannon to steamroll his way through every scene. As proven in “Drumline” and “Love Don’t Cost a Thing,” Cannon is Eddie Murphy lite, trying frantically to emulate his idol, yet failing to possess even one similar attribute. “Underclassman” is like watching somebody’s kid brother make a film about how funny they are.

Also disconcerting is Cannon’s overwhelming need to point out his skin color in every scene. I kid you not, Cannon points out his African-American heritage whenever he can, I assume trying urgently to get the urban audience on his side. “Underclassman” is filled with this dreary material, including a nerdy Caucasian “wannabe thug” classmate of Tracy’s, and a portly cop, who (of course) is a slob, and in the film’s most insulting sequence, has trouble defecating in a bush. This is the material that “Underclassman” seems most proud of.

Cannon strokes himself further with the inclusion of a subplot that has Tracy flirting with his Spanish teacher (a wasted Roselyn Sanchez), who actually considers returning the affections. Only in the movies would there be a teacher who looks like Sanchez, and only in Hollywood would she consider throwing her life away for Nick Cannon.

Seiga and Cannon attempt to pay off the story by adding an insanely ludicrous plot twist, and completing the lobotomy on the audience by staging needless explosions for the finale in an effort to cover up the rest of the nonsense. I guess “Underclassman” is a good showcase for Cannon’s talents: now there’s actual proof that he doesn’t have any.

My rating: D-