FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Norman Jewison |||
Norman Jewison

Yes, he directed “Moonstruck” and two unforgettable musicals, but Jewison is also responsible for a trilogy of films focusing on racial-injustice, a whacky Cold War comedy and a signature film of Steve McQueen’s showing that he is one of the most versatile directors since Robert Wise.

This blueprint for good investigation dramas tells the story of a black Philadelphia detective investigating a murder in Mississippi who matches wits with a redneck sheriff. Groundbreaking for it’s time, this Oscar winning film is still relevant today and offers a gripping mystery with terrific dramatic performances by a complete cast of fully realized characters.

This is an amazingly funny and entertaining irreverent "Cold War" comedy about a Russian submarine stranded outside an isolated New England town, which throws the locals into a panic. Jewison does a delightful job of utilizing his all-star cast to their fullest, deftly mixing Capra-esq characters with Mel Brooks’s type situations (and vise-versa).

A bored millionaire (Steve McQueen in his prime) masterminds a flawless bank job as Faye Dunaway (an insurance investigator out to get him) identifies him as the mastermind and falls in love along the way. This is the original and the best, with all the arch stylized movie techniques of the ‘60s (including split-screen and fuzzy shallow focus) and the most erotic chess game ever captured on screen.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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Rize

By BrianOrndorf

June 23rd, 2005

The battle between the Krumpers and the Clowns is captured in the documentary, “Rize.” Directed by music video menace David LaChapelle, “Rize” works when he just puts a camera on the dancing and leaves the visuals alone. However, it wouldn’t be LaChapelle if it wasn’t over-stylized and unpleasant to look at, which leaves the rest of the this preachy, limp ode to spastic dancing feeling like a punishment.


In south central Los Angeles, there are two new schools of dance growing at an alarming rate: Krumping and Clowning. Set against the backdrop of a neighborhood that has a horrible reputation (often deserved), the new documentary “Rize” looks to shine a positive light through observing artistic expression and witnessing demonstrations of humanity.

Of course, this look at extreme dancing is brought to the world by director David LaChapelle, a privileged Caucasian music video filmmaker who gave the world the Christina Aguilera “Dirrty” event. LaChapelle, also a fashion photographer, probably isn’t the most dependable filmmaker to take this journey into the world of Krumping with, but he has street cred, and “Rize” does have moments where you can’t your eyes off the dazzling movement presented with striking clarity.

Expectedly, “Rize” is strongest when it only concerns the unique dancing and its debatable artistic merit. We meet the members of the two teams of dancers, and they detail their life stories and what brought them to the medium, portraying themselves as hardened individuals who love the creativity and individuality the two dance styles bring them. If there’s a central character to “Rize,” it’s found in Tommy the Clown, a hip-hop jester who kicked off the painted-face Clowning routine years back, only to see its spastic offspring, Krumping (imagine genitals dipped in hot sauce, and that might explain how this frantic, elastic dance looks to the average outsider), take a more popular slice of the attention cake. Tommy is a warm personality, and his desire to help his community is one of the bright spots of the film, especially when that desire is unexpectedly violated with vandalism and theft after his Clowning gang gets the best of the Krumpers at a local competition.

However, this being LaChapelle, “Rize” features far too many cripplingly preachy and stylistic flourishes. “Rize” soon morphs into a requiem for the troubled area, complete with an opening montage of historic riot footage, and a closing quote by Martin Luther King. Whatever LaChapelle is trying to say about the African-American experience in this neighborhood is constantly erased by his visual flair, which often captures the Krumpers in slow-mo, heavily soaked for maximum glistening abdominal action, directly compromising the actual dance, which relies on speed and low-tech self-brutality.

And for those in the audience who just don’t get primal beat behind Krumping and Clowning, LaChapelle has included file footage of African tribes dancing in similar ways just to hammer home the point. Offensive or enlightening? You tell me.

“Rize” has energy, but it comes across in a Gap commercial way that doesn’t do justice to what these residents are trying to accomplish and escape from. For now, “Rize” is a good time capsule and little more.

My rating: C-