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A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Andrei Tarkovsky |||
Andrei Tarkovsky

Tarkovsky's contemplative, metaphysical films, more experienced than watched, are perhaps best described in the director's own words: sculptures in time.

In the post-apocalypse, a writer and scientist hire a "stalker" to guide them into The Zone, a mysterious and restricted wasteland with fabled, alien properties. Their journey, captured by Tarkovsky as a succession of incredible images, has, since, been read as political commentary, religious allegory, and Chernobyl prophesized.

Tarkovsky's visionary biography of the 15th-century icon painter is one of cinema's most majestic and solemn experiences. In some way, it will change you.

An adaptation of Stanis?aw Lem's novel of the same name, Tarkovsky's genre-less sci-fi film, which is set mostly aboard a space station hovering off a strange planet, tangles with issues of identity, death and reality in a way that will leave you agape, in the full meaning.

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Rize

By BrianOrndorf

June 23rd, 2005

The battle between the Krumpers and the Clowns is captured in the documentary, “Rize.” Directed by music video menace David LaChapelle, “Rize” works when he just puts a camera on the dancing and leaves the visuals alone. However, it wouldn’t be LaChapelle if it wasn’t over-stylized and unpleasant to look at, which leaves the rest of the this preachy, limp ode to spastic dancing feeling like a punishment.


In south central Los Angeles, there are two new schools of dance growing at an alarming rate: Krumping and Clowning. Set against the backdrop of a neighborhood that has a horrible reputation (often deserved), the new documentary “Rize” looks to shine a positive light through observing artistic expression and witnessing demonstrations of humanity.

Of course, this look at extreme dancing is brought to the world by director David LaChapelle, a privileged Caucasian music video filmmaker who gave the world the Christina Aguilera “Dirrty” event. LaChapelle, also a fashion photographer, probably isn’t the most dependable filmmaker to take this journey into the world of Krumping with, but he has street cred, and “Rize” does have moments where you can’t your eyes off the dazzling movement presented with striking clarity.

Expectedly, “Rize” is strongest when it only concerns the unique dancing and its debatable artistic merit. We meet the members of the two teams of dancers, and they detail their life stories and what brought them to the medium, portraying themselves as hardened individuals who love the creativity and individuality the two dance styles bring them. If there’s a central character to “Rize,” it’s found in Tommy the Clown, a hip-hop jester who kicked off the painted-face Clowning routine years back, only to see its spastic offspring, Krumping (imagine genitals dipped in hot sauce, and that might explain how this frantic, elastic dance looks to the average outsider), take a more popular slice of the attention cake. Tommy is a warm personality, and his desire to help his community is one of the bright spots of the film, especially when that desire is unexpectedly violated with vandalism and theft after his Clowning gang gets the best of the Krumpers at a local competition.

However, this being LaChapelle, “Rize” features far too many cripplingly preachy and stylistic flourishes. “Rize” soon morphs into a requiem for the troubled area, complete with an opening montage of historic riot footage, and a closing quote by Martin Luther King. Whatever LaChapelle is trying to say about the African-American experience in this neighborhood is constantly erased by his visual flair, which often captures the Krumpers in slow-mo, heavily soaked for maximum glistening abdominal action, directly compromising the actual dance, which relies on speed and low-tech self-brutality.

And for those in the audience who just don’t get primal beat behind Krumping and Clowning, LaChapelle has included file footage of African tribes dancing in similar ways just to hammer home the point. Offensive or enlightening? You tell me.

“Rize” has energy, but it comes across in a Gap commercial way that doesn’t do justice to what these residents are trying to accomplish and escape from. For now, “Rize” is a good time capsule and little more.

My rating: C-