FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| John Sturges |||
John Sturges

Helming the “Magnificent Seven” should be reason enough, demonstrating that Sturges had the happy talent of taking what was considered strictly “male” oriented stories and making them sexy enough and humorous enough to appeal to female movie-goer as well.

Sturges takes this star-studded gunslinger film based on the Japanese favorite "The Seven Samurai", and makes it a bone fide all-American classic featuring Yul Brynner. At the request of Mexican peasants, Brynner recruits a band of fellow mercenaries, half of whom Sturges introduces as the next generation of action film super-stars including Charles Bronson, James Coburn, and Steve McQueen. Widescreen!

Sturges is responsible for what is renowned as one of the greatest war films ever made, featuring Steve McQueen and his unforgettably daring motorcycle jumps in the face of the enemy. Allied prisoners escape from a German POW camp in this superior effort, noted for a brilliant international cast and Elmer Bernstein's triumphant score. Widescreen!

This day in the life of a stranger in an isolated town has since been done to death, and this is why. In the hands of a lesser director the talents of this exceedingly manly cast (Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan) would otherwise overwhelm this compelling drama with a prejudice theme, but Sturges is able to maintain a firm grasp of the reigns, keeping his actors this side of mellow drama. Widescreen!

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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The Perfect Man

By BrianOrndorf

June 20th, 2005

Hilary Duff returns to screen again…with exactly the same type of film she’s been making for the last two years. “The Perfect Man” is redeemed somewhat by Heather Locklear’s interesting performance, but the rest is Hollywood at its most manipulative, tedious, and flavorless.


Holly Hamilton (Hilary Duff) is a frustrated teenager constantly moved around the country by her mother Jean (Heather Locklear) in an effort to find a good man she can love and marry. Finding a new home in Brooklyn, Holly takes it upon herself to create a perfect “secret admirer” for Jean, using a restaurant owner (Chris Noth, “Sex and the City”) with a special feel for women as her template. When Jean becomes wrapped up in this mysterious man, Holly quickly gets in over her head, and is soon looking for a way to let her love struck mother down without breaking her heart.

One cannot blame tween superstar Hilary Duff for strip-mining her appeal with film after film of forgettable quality; however, “The Perfect Man” is a cry for help. This mild, vanilla concoction, that doesn’t have a desire in the world to color outside the lines, is reason enough to start thinking that playing mildly perturbed teens is all Duff can do.

“Man” is the kind of softball Hollywood audience-pleaser that completely fails to register on any type of emotional or entertainment level. It’s hardly an attack on the senses, and the way it slowly takes a lap around cliché after cliché is maddening. The film clearly doesn’t understand it has no substance, no matter how hard it tries. “Man” is too creepy to be a thoughtful romantic comedy, for its foundation is poured with lies and deception, which the picture tries to pass off as tough love and devotion. And “Man” hardly works as a comedy. When faced with supporting cast of Mike O’Malley, Carson Kressley, and Caroline Rhea as the comic relief, it shouldn’t shock that “Man” doesn’t even contain a simple titter. The rest of the film is a maudlin mush from the screenwriter of “Coyote Ugly,” which should give you an indication of the quality and shameless, flavorless manipulation “Man” contains.

Inside this hollow creation does lay some interesting performances, none of which belong to Hilary Duff. The young star (teaming again with her lackluster “Cinderella Story” director Mark Rosman) has simply gone to this well of well-dressed adolescent awkwardness too many times, and “Man” asks nothing of her aside from some odd facial gesturing and to ignite some impossible chemistry with her bland love interest (Ben Feldman). Duff relies too much on her known persona. She needs an acting challenge right away, or she’ll morph into the new Sandra Dee before she knows it.

Keeping “Man” compelling the best she can is Heather Locklear, who not only bravely embraces her age with this role, but is also able to manufacture a lifeline behind the cartoonish screenwriting she’s given. Locklear seems to be the only human character on display here, exploring her character’s passionate feelings of insecurity and fear of future loneliness with unusual clarity. Frankly, losing Duff and her brand of Teen Beat nonsense in favor of following Locklear around would’ve done the movie a world of good. Locklear survives the material (even when faced with lame Styx jokes), but only barely, and provides the real reason why anyone should view “The Perfect Man.”

My rating: D+