FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| David Lean |||
David Lean

Honored with the American Film Institute Life Achievement Award in 1990, Lean’s body of work (ranging from the intimate film to the grandiose epic) demonstrates an obsessive cultivation of craft and a fastidious concern with detail that has become the very definition of quality British cinema.

Adapted from Noel Coward’s one-act play, Lean takes a potentially boring story of middle-age flirtation and tenderly creates one of the most enduring and poignant romance films ever made. Brilliantly underplayed, two happily married strangers meet by chance in a railway station and fall desperately in love, but never physically express the undercurrent of passion that exists between them, even during their final gut wrenching separation – if your heart doesn’t ache, you’re just not human!

Demonstrating moments of intimacy through gigantic display, Lean sets up the greatness of Pip’s expectations with the magnitude of his frightful encounters; one with an escaped convict, whose emerge into the frame reminds us what it’s like to be a child in a world of oversized, menacing adults, and another with the meeting of mad Miss Havisham, in all her gothic splendor.

Peter O'Toole made an enigmatic and lasting impression in his debut role as British officer T.E. Lawrence, who helped Arab rebels fight the Turks in WWI, and Omar Sharif has perhaps the greatest cinematic intro of all time as he magically appears through the ghostly waves of the desert heat, achieving Lean’s compulsive drive to create the perfectly composed shot. Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Jose Ferrer, and Claude Rains round out this incredibly talented and magnetically charged cast.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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The Perfect Man

By BrianOrndorf

June 20th, 2005

Hilary Duff returns to screen again…with exactly the same type of film she’s been making for the last two years. “The Perfect Man” is redeemed somewhat by Heather Locklear’s interesting performance, but the rest is Hollywood at its most manipulative, tedious, and flavorless.


Holly Hamilton (Hilary Duff) is a frustrated teenager constantly moved around the country by her mother Jean (Heather Locklear) in an effort to find a good man she can love and marry. Finding a new home in Brooklyn, Holly takes it upon herself to create a perfect “secret admirer” for Jean, using a restaurant owner (Chris Noth, “Sex and the City”) with a special feel for women as her template. When Jean becomes wrapped up in this mysterious man, Holly quickly gets in over her head, and is soon looking for a way to let her love struck mother down without breaking her heart.

One cannot blame tween superstar Hilary Duff for strip-mining her appeal with film after film of forgettable quality; however, “The Perfect Man” is a cry for help. This mild, vanilla concoction, that doesn’t have a desire in the world to color outside the lines, is reason enough to start thinking that playing mildly perturbed teens is all Duff can do.

“Man” is the kind of softball Hollywood audience-pleaser that completely fails to register on any type of emotional or entertainment level. It’s hardly an attack on the senses, and the way it slowly takes a lap around cliché after cliché is maddening. The film clearly doesn’t understand it has no substance, no matter how hard it tries. “Man” is too creepy to be a thoughtful romantic comedy, for its foundation is poured with lies and deception, which the picture tries to pass off as tough love and devotion. And “Man” hardly works as a comedy. When faced with supporting cast of Mike O’Malley, Carson Kressley, and Caroline Rhea as the comic relief, it shouldn’t shock that “Man” doesn’t even contain a simple titter. The rest of the film is a maudlin mush from the screenwriter of “Coyote Ugly,” which should give you an indication of the quality and shameless, flavorless manipulation “Man” contains.

Inside this hollow creation does lay some interesting performances, none of which belong to Hilary Duff. The young star (teaming again with her lackluster “Cinderella Story” director Mark Rosman) has simply gone to this well of well-dressed adolescent awkwardness too many times, and “Man” asks nothing of her aside from some odd facial gesturing and to ignite some impossible chemistry with her bland love interest (Ben Feldman). Duff relies too much on her known persona. She needs an acting challenge right away, or she’ll morph into the new Sandra Dee before she knows it.

Keeping “Man” compelling the best she can is Heather Locklear, who not only bravely embraces her age with this role, but is also able to manufacture a lifeline behind the cartoonish screenwriting she’s given. Locklear seems to be the only human character on display here, exploring her character’s passionate feelings of insecurity and fear of future loneliness with unusual clarity. Frankly, losing Duff and her brand of Teen Beat nonsense in favor of following Locklear around would’ve done the movie a world of good. Locklear survives the material (even when faced with lame Styx jokes), but only barely, and provides the real reason why anyone should view “The Perfect Man.”

My rating: D+