FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| John Ford |||
John Ford

One of the art form's grand masters of all time, Ford is responsible for influencing the seminal directors of generation after generation. Strongly associated with the impressive body of work created over a lifetime with collaborator John Wayne, it is nearly impossible to choose just three… but here it goes.

This powerful winner of the Best Picture Academy Award is set in Wales at the turn of the 19th century, and tells the story of a family of miners, whose lives are filled with danger and repression. The film is beautifully crafted, lovingly depicting the gut wrenching sacrifices and light-hearted moments that are elemental to family life, making this film a true representation of the craft that is unmistakably John Ford.

This film is told in flashback as James Stewart, after a long absence, returns home for the funeral of a friend who saved his life from a sadistic outlaw. This classic covers every essential element required to qualify as a western epic from unlikely friends to the girl who comes between them, to the enemy they both despise, but handle with extremely different approaches, to Fords signature cast of supporting characters, all combine to make this a staple for every fan of this uniquely American genre.

This romantic comedy seen through the eyes of John Ford has John Wayne ( an American-raised boxer) go to Ireland to the village of his birth, fall for feisty Maureen O'Hara, and fight with town ruffian Victor McLaglen in one of the all time classic screen brawls. This is an exceptionally fine romantic movie that with Ford’s capable bravado manages to be a film that any man’s man can openly enjoy.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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House of D

By BrianOrndorf

April 27th, 2005

As an actor, I’ve enjoyed David Duchovny’s work for years. However, his directorial debut, “House of D,” brings tears to my eyes, and not of joy. This lackluster, amateurish stab at a coming-of-age drama means well, but doesn’t have much in terms of quality in its favor.


On the eve of his son’s 13th birthday, Tommy (David Duchovny) decides to reassess his own childhood as a gift to his boy, taking him back to the year 1973, when he was turning the same age. A young man, Tommy (Anton Yelchin, “Hearts in Atlantis”) and his mentally challenged friend Pappas (Robin Williams) ruled the New York streets where they lived. However, their time of enthusiasm and mischief draws to a close when Tommy’s widowed mother (Tea Leoni) becomes suicidal and his first love (Zelda Williams) threatens his tight relationship with Pappas. Hope comes to Tommy in the form of a female convict (Erykah Badu) at the local detention center, who offers Tommy advice on his unmanageable life.

David Duchovny as an actor? A unique and dryly comic performer whose sharp wit livens up most movies he appears in. Duchovny as a writer/director? An embarrassment. “House of D” marks the directorial debut for the veteran actor, and it shows undeniably that Duchovny should stick in front of the camera rather than behind it.

While it is an utter mess of a motion picture, “House of D” is not a mean-spirited creation. Supposedly semi-autobiographical, the film strolls down the same coming-of-age boyhood pathway taken by many movies. Yet, Duchovny’s creation is a very odd one indeed. While it includes the expected sweetness and tragedy, Duchovny’s screenplay veers wildly into weird sexual situations (Pappas gets an erection after watching a horror film), threadbare narrative devices (found in the women’s detention center subplot), and a bookending device with the adult Tommy that relies on breathlessly long voiceover stretches that only exacerbate the fragile grasp on quality that “House” holds.

The glaring problem with “House” is that Duchovny isn’t able to translate his own words to the screen with grace. For example, upon learning of his mother’s hospitalization, Tommy scoops up the cigarette butts from the toilet that his mother recently left behind, and wraps them gently in paper, somberly treasuring the last remnants of his only living parent. On paper, this would probably kick the reader in the gut with its tender power and sadness. In the film, however, the scene doesn’t lure that type of emotion, even going so far as to come off a little gross. Duchovny fills “House” with many moments like this, of such immediate poignancy, which cannot penetrate his stilted direction and are left to die in front of a rudely snickering audience.

Duchovny’s camerawork also hurts his actors. Even by low-budget standards, “House” in inexplicably murky to look at and Duchovny’s poor shot choices hang his talent out to dry. Young actor Yelchin receives the worst treatment, for his affected but charming performance is ruined in its final moments by the director’s inability to understand how to edit or cover a scene properly. What should be a sequence of an emotional wellspring shooting out of Tommy as he arrives at the end of his options becomes this awkward, grimace-inducing scene when Duchovny can’t find a respectful and effective angle to work with, but he keeps on with the moment, even though it’s fallen to pieces.

“House of D” is a heartfelt production, and a tough one to kick around, but to recommend it on intentions alone would be making many innocent people suffer.

My rating: D+