FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| John Huston |||
John Huston

Over the span of his impressive career director John Huston created one of the most distinctive signatures in the history of the movies without limiting the incredible range of his subject or choice of genre.

At first it's hard to believe that macho director John Huston could be responsible or such a sweet and touching story of a Novitiate nun (Deborah Kerr) and a Marine (Robert Mitchum) dependant on one another as they hide from the Japanese on a Pacific island, but for those familiar with "The African Queen" it isn't hard to see his influence on the strong yet subtle impressive performance he draws from Mitchum and the ever present excitement he creates in this WWII drama. In Widescreen!

Only a director as abundantly macho as John Huston could so adeptly handle such testosterone laden stars Sean Connery and Michael Caine in this rousing Rudyard Kipling adventure set in 1800s India. Huston masterfully balances the fun of male camaraderie with constant imminent danger as the two soldiers attempt to dupe a remote village of their gold by passing off Connery as a god, and in the process produces a Kipling adventure to rival "Gunga Din". Widescreen

Huston co-wrote this gritty and trend-setting drama about a gang of small-time crooks who plan and execute the "perfect crime". This is the grand daddy of caper films executed with a firm expert hand that unflinchingly guides the raw performances (including Marilyn Monroe in her first role) of these dark and ill-fated characters.

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King's Ransom

By BrianOrndorf

April 22nd, 2005

Anthony Anderson headlining his own comedy? "King's Ransom" never stood a chance of being good.


Malcolm King (Anthony Anderson) is a filthy rich, conceited CEO on the eve of a divorce from his wife (Kellita Smith, “The Bernie Mac Show”) that will cost him millions. Looking to prevent any loss of his beloved wealth, he enlists his dimwitted mistress Peaches (Regina Hall, “Scary Movie”) into arranging a mock kidnapping to force his wife into hasty legal decisions. Unfortunately for Malcolm, many associates in his life have the same plans, with the arrogant businessman inadvertently ending up in the home of Corey (Jay Mohr), a loser in way over his head.

Rotund, all-mouth comedian Anthony Anderson has stumbled upon a small morsel of fame recently playing sidekicks in such films as “Kangaroo Jack” and “Barbershop.” How this happened, I could never explain. Anderson’s aggressive comedic skills leave a lot to be desired, amplified horrifically when the actor decides he’ll improv his way through a scene. Watching Anderson try to be funny is like getting a tooth pulled, or sitting through a Tim Burton DVD audio commentary. So what to make of “King’s Ransom,” a film where Anderson is the star of the production? You don’t have to shake a magic 8-ball to see where this is headed.

Straight-to-video maestro Jeff Byrd makes his big screen directorial debut with “Ransom,” and I’ll give the filmmaker this, his picture isn’t boring. Byrd keeps the pace snappy as he plows through his checklist of thug life urban clichés (gold teeth, car fetishes, deeply sexualized women), flatulence jokes, and Anderson’s train whistle delivery. Byrd keeps his film on target, though what he’s battling to maintain really isn’t something to be proud of. There’s nothing in “Ransom” that hasn’t already been covered in countless other urban films, including the slapstick humiliation of Caucasians and the monotone thumpity-thump-thump-thump hip-hop soundtrack. “Ransom” doesn’t want to challenge the genre in the least, instead it imagines itself a comedic farce, which it could’ve become if not for Anderson’s shrill, lazy performance.

The only comic inspiration that seems to work in “Ransom” comes from Donald Faison (“Scrubs”) and Charlie Murphy as two fringe players in the outrageous Malcolm King kidnap game. While playing his umpteenth convict character, it’s hard to deny Murphy’s hilarious newfound sense of comic timing due to his stellar work on “Chappelle’s Show.” Matching him well is Faison, who delights in playing up the fear (both sexual and physical) his character has of Murphy. They make an amusing team, and “Ransom” rockets up in interest when these two are onscreen. Sadly, Byrd doesn’t seem to feel the same way, and only sporadically cuts back to their subplot.

“King’s Ransom” might fly by in a blur, but it still reeks of low quality. While I’m sure there will come a day when Anthony Anderson is ready to carry his own film, after sitting through this one, I hope it doesn’t come anytime soon.

My rating: D