FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Joseph L. Mankiewicz |||
Joseph L. Mankiewicz

Mankiewicz directed 20 films in a 26-year period, and was very successful at every kind of film, from Shakespeare to western, drama to musical, epics to two-character pictures, and regardless of the genre, he was known as a witty dialogist, a master in the use of flashback and a talented actors' director.

The 1950 Oscar for Best Picture and Screenplay brought Mankiewicz wide recognition as a writer and a director, with his sardonic look at show business glamour and the empty lives behind it. This well orchestrated cast of brilliant and catty character actors is built around veteran actress Bette Davis and Anne Baxter as her understudy desperate for stardom.

One of Mankiewicz’ more intimate films, this highly regarded and major artistic achievement is a spirited romantic comedy set in England of the 1880’s about a widow who moves into a haunted seashore house and resists the attempts of a sea captain specter to scare her away. This is a pleasing and poignant romance that is equally satisfying as a good old ghost story.

Mankiewicz wrote and directed this witty dissection of matrimony that has three women review the ups and downs of their marriages (with all its romance, fears and foibles) after receiving a letter telling them that one of their husbands has been unfaithful. Once again Mankiewicz deftly utilizes the skills of a well-chosen ensemble, which includes a young Kirk Douglas at his dreamiest.

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Ballad of Jack and Rose, The

By BrianOrndorf

March 24th, 2005

Rebecca Miller’s “The Ballad of Jack and Rose” is a unique bit of cinema, which channels a chunk of Lars von Trier’s lustful, symbolic filmmaking style. It’s great to see Daniel Day-Lewis back in action, and while the picture eventually swerves out of control, it remains an interesting portrait of a poisonous family dynamic.


Living a solitary island life in an abandoned hippie commune off the east coast of America, Jack (Daniel Day-Lewis) and teenaged Rose (Camilla Belle, “The Invisible Circus”) have developed a tight, mildly obsessive father-daughter bond. Wary of encroaching land developers and battling an ailing heart, Jack invites his girlfriend Kathleen (Catherine Keener) to come live on the island for emergency purposes. Arriving with her two sons (Paul Dano and Ryan McDonald), Kathleen’s entrance immediately registers as a threat to Rose, whose loose grip on sanity is tested as she dreams of increasingly vivid ways to get rid of this unfamiliar woman.

For her third film, writer/director Rebecca Miller (daughter of the recently deceased playwright Arthur Miller) has finally lost her mind. After trying to capture the emotional workings of relationships in the dazzling “Personal Velocity” and “Angela,” Miller has decided to get highly theatrical with her screenwriting and direction. “The Ballad of Jack and Rose” is Miller’s attempt to channel Lars von Trier’s particular brand of symbolism and chaotic human interaction. As an investigation of disturbing behavior, the film is near perfect. As a dramatic creation, Miller’s inventive filmmaking skills have failed her.

“Jack and Rose” is a film of immense peculiarity. Miller has devised a film that addresses all types of behavioral and community issues, and smashed them into one film. The stress of the ideas weigh heavily on the plot, which touches on lost hippie idealism, forbidden incestuous thoughts, and violent jealousy. The cast is game to let Miller lead them along on this winding road, but her focus fuzzes out towards the end, leaving a great range of themes only half realized. Miller also doesn’t do her creation many favors by pitching the material so broadly, complete with a symbolic biblical snake slithering around the compound. It’s an interesting von Trierish move to add some hysteria into movie, but it comes off as strained ornamentation when the performances and interpersonal dynamics are so rich and gripping.

Enlisting husband Daniel Day-Lewis back into acting (his second film in 8 years) was an excellent move on Miller’s part to inject “Jack and Rose” with some authentic poignancy. After his towering acting achievement in Scorsese’s “Gangs of New York.” (one of the best performances of the last 10 years) Day-Lewis’s Jack isn’t as bombastic as Bill the Butcher, but the performance radiates with Jack’s violent, disintegrating idealized view of America, and its lost potential. The audience can feel his anger and disappointment with the planned destruction of the environment through suburban sprawl, and his frustrations dealing with his psychotic daughter. It’s a great performance, and works beautifully with Camilla Belle’s poison ivy Rose to create a portrait of a dangerous familial relationship, where death is seemingly (and claustrophobically) the only possible closure to this story.

Miller captures behavior so expertly that when the story starts to take over, as seen in Jack’s struggle with a greedy land developer (Beau Bridges), the film visibly sags, and starts to get grabby with motivations. There’s an interesting, unique character exploration under this cloudy film, but it’s worth the sit to witness the insanity.

My rating: B