FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| John Ford |||
John Ford

One of the art form's grand masters of all time, Ford is responsible for influencing the seminal directors of generation after generation. Strongly associated with the impressive body of work created over a lifetime with collaborator John Wayne, it is nearly impossible to choose just three… but here it goes.

This powerful winner of the Best Picture Academy Award is set in Wales at the turn of the 19th century, and tells the story of a family of miners, whose lives are filled with danger and repression. The film is beautifully crafted, lovingly depicting the gut wrenching sacrifices and light-hearted moments that are elemental to family life, making this film a true representation of the craft that is unmistakably John Ford.

This film is told in flashback as James Stewart, after a long absence, returns home for the funeral of a friend who saved his life from a sadistic outlaw. This classic covers every essential element required to qualify as a western epic from unlikely friends to the girl who comes between them, to the enemy they both despise, but handle with extremely different approaches, to Fords signature cast of supporting characters, all combine to make this a staple for every fan of this uniquely American genre.

This romantic comedy seen through the eyes of John Ford has John Wayne ( an American-raised boxer) go to Ireland to the village of his birth, fall for feisty Maureen O'Hara, and fight with town ruffian Victor McLaglen in one of the all time classic screen brawls. This is an exceptionally fine romantic movie that with Ford’s capable bravado manages to be a film that any man’s man can openly enjoy.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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Noel

By EdwardHavens

November 12th, 2004

Chazz Palminteri may play a tough guy mobster or tough guy cop as an actor, but for his feature directorial debut, he shows off his gentile side, with some success. “Noel” may be sentimental and sappy enough to keep a maple syrup factory busy all year long, but isn’t that the point of Christmas movies anyway?


It’s Christmas Eve in Manhattan, and there are as many different feelings about the holidays as there are people in the city. Rose (Susan Sarandon) is a successful book editor, but her professional success masks her private pains, being the sole caregiver for her ill mother and having recently been divorced. Jules (Marcus Thomas) is a troubled twentysomething haunted by his sole fond Christmas memory, with no family or friends to help him through his predicament. Mike (Paul Walker) is one of New York’s finest, just a week away from his wedding to the beautiful Nina (Penelope Cruz), whose jealousy and paranoia has driven here away. Mike also has to deal with Artie (Alan Arkin), a kindly older man at a local diner who believes he knows Mike from long ago. Meanwhile, Nina makes a life-changing discovery which must force her to make a hard decision about her relationship with Mike.

Like many Christmas-themed movies of yore, a mysterious person figures into the story, and here that seraph is Charlie, the first visitor Rose has ever seen to the comatose man who is cared for in the hospital room across from her mother. Feeling down after a failed date with a much younger office colleague (Daniel Sunjata, from “Rescue Me”), Rose opens up to this stranger in the other room, a former priest who left his parish after a crisis of conscience, who reminds her that no one is truly alone at Christmastime. But isn’t that the whole point of Christmas movies? George Bailey learned the hard way he was not alone, in “It’s A Wonderful Life,” as did Willie T. Stokes in “Bad Santa.” We are not alone, as long as we open ourselves up to the wonderful possibilities of life and the people who surround us.

While “Noel” really has nothing original to say, Palminteri makes the whole hokey mess work, using the considerable charms of his ensemble to maximum value, with Walker especially showing hints that he’s got more talent than anyone has given him credit for with the “Fast and the Furious” movies. As shot by “Titanic” cinematographer Russell Carpenter, “Noel” makes New York City look beautiful, especially the few scenes actually shot in New York City (Montreal, of all places, stands in for The Big Apple for most of the film’s running time), and Alan Menken’s score effectively conveys the spirit of the holidays.

”Noel” is likely to annoy cynics who have a hard time just letting a simple, sweet story envelop them, and there is no argument the individual stories and their conclusions are utterly simplistic, but should find an appreciative audience amongst those who still enjoy everything about the Christmas holiday season.

My rating: B-