FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| David Lean |||
David Lean

Honored with the American Film Institute Life Achievement Award in 1990, Leanís body of work (ranging from the intimate film to the grandiose epic) demonstrates an obsessive cultivation of craft and a fastidious concern with detail that has become the very definition of quality British cinema.

Adapted from Noel Cowardís one-act play, Lean takes a potentially boring story of middle-age flirtation and tenderly creates one of the most enduring and poignant romance films ever made. Brilliantly underplayed, two happily married strangers meet by chance in a railway station and fall desperately in love, but never physically express the undercurrent of passion that exists between them, even during their final gut wrenching separation Ė if your heart doesnít ache, youíre just not human!

Demonstrating moments of intimacy through gigantic display, Lean sets up the greatness of Pipís expectations with the magnitude of his frightful encounters; one with an escaped convict, whose emerge into the frame reminds us what itís like to be a child in a world of oversized, menacing adults, and another with the meeting of mad Miss Havisham, in all her gothic splendor.

Peter O'Toole made an enigmatic and lasting impression in his debut role as British officer T.E. Lawrence, who helped Arab rebels fight the Turks in WWI, and Omar Sharif has perhaps the greatest cinematic intro of all time as he magically appears through the ghostly waves of the desert heat, achieving Leanís compulsive drive to create the perfectly composed shot. Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Jose Ferrer, and Claude Rains round out this incredibly talented and magnetically charged cast.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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Ju-On

By EdwardHavens

July 21st, 2004

After some time of underground hype, thanks to its availability on import DVD's and peer-to-peer networks, the Japanese horror film "Ju-On" (film has lost its subtitle, "The Grudge") finally makes its belated American theatrical debut this summer, a few months before the release of the American remake starring Sarah Michelle Gellar. Promising a mixture of terror and excitement to rival "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" and the "Evil Dead" series, film instead comes off as a nearly bloodless and scare-free exercise in futility, jumping from scene to scene with very little continuity and even less comprehension of the concept of true fear.


After a short title card explaining the concept of "Ju-On," in which a curse is born of a grudge held by a person who dies in the grip of a powerful anger and recreating itself with every subsequent victim, the story begins as Rika, a volunteer home-care worker, is assigned to visit the house of a bed-ridden older woman, after the previous home-care person goes missing. Rika discovers a filthy home and the old woman lying in a soiled bed, perceptibly horrified of an unseen force. Investigating the two-story dwelling, Rika finds in an upstairs bedroom a closet covered with duct tape, where she finds a young boy and a black cat. The boy disappears, and Rika soon sees a spirit floating over the old woman, sending her into a deep shock. Thus begins a series of incidents involving the old woman's son, his wife and younger sister, a close friend of Rika's, the detective who previously investigated a murder at the house, his family and a group of his daughter's friends, all whom fall prey to the vengeance of the spirit where the grudge began.

Like a number of Al Adamson's movies from the 1970s, the film does not deliver on its promises. Like far too many low-budget independent horror films, the scares are few and far between, with the filmmakers sadly substituting extra loud sound effects in place of scenes of real terror. It also does not help that there is not a single character developed to any degree to actually care about their situations. Despite the explanation at the start, there is little attempt to tie most of the characters or storylines, told in a series of Tarantino-esque bouncing back and forth through time sequences, together. Some characters come and go, disappear and presumed dead, only to reappear moments later. Others only show up to help torment specific people at a specific time, despite not having anything to do with any of those previously falling victim to the grudge, before disappearing, never to be heard from or spoken about again. A true deus ex machina.

Not that incoherent storylines and one-dimensional characters are seen as detrimental to an audience's enjoyment of a film. Sometimes, it's fun to just sit back and enjoy a horror movie without complex themes or intricate depictions of interesting people. Provided, of course, the film has genuine scares, an interesting visual motif or effective sound effects. However, this may be the very first time I've seen an R-rated (for some disturbing images) horror film that did not shock me once. A remake of his 2000 direct to video feature, hopefully director Takashi Shimizu will get it right the third time around, being the director of that previously mentioned American remake.

My rating: D