FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Francis Ford Coppola |||
Francis Ford Coppola

Coppola is an amazing talent whose inspiration and influence spans many generations. Virtually the link between the studio system of yesteryear and the independent minded filmmaker of the modern age, Coppola became the first major film director to emerge from a university degree program in filmmaking, thus legitimizing a now common route for many future filmmakers.

This Academy Award winner continues to enjoy an enormous critical and popular success due in large part to Coppola’s ability to break down an epic saga of crime and the struggle for power into the basic story of a father and his sons, punctuating the prevalent theme throughout Coppola’s oeuvre: the importance of family in today’s world. His personal portrait mixed tender moments with harsh brutality and redefined the genre of gangster films.

This intense, yet unassuming thriller has an impact that touches the viewer on a personal level and raises the question of privacy and security in a world of technology – thirty years ago! Coppola’s then virtually unknown cast is a roster of inevitable superstars, including Gene Hackman, Harrison Ford, and Robert Duvall. This Academy Award nominee for Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, and Best Sound lost out to Coppola’s other great effort of the year, The Godfather: Part II.

Coppola's masterful Vietnam War-updating of Joseph Conrad's "Heart of Darkness" was the first major motion picture about the infamous “conflict”. This colossal epic was shot on location in the Philippines over the course of more than a year and contains some of the most extraordinary combat footage ever filmed. Unforgettable battle sequences and sterling performances from every cast member (including Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Dennis Hopper, Laurence Fishburne, Harrison Ford, Scott Glenn, and Martin Sheen) mark this Academy Award-winning drama as a must-see for any true film fanatic.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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Twisted

By BrianOrndorf

February 27th, 2004

The new serial killer/sex thriller “Twisted” recalls a day when Joe Eszterhas ruled the screenplay world. With its convoluted plotting, awful performances, and puzzler ending, “Twisted” had a clear shot at becoming a treasured guilty pleasure, but instead it’s just an old-fashioned bad time at the movies.


Jessica Shepard (Ashley Judd) is a San Francisco street cop who has just been promoted to detective. Her first case involves tracking a serial killer who has a peculiar choice of victim: ex-lovers involved with Jessica’s promiscuous and sexually violent lifestyle. Horrified, Jessica attempts to keep this information away from her mentor (Samuel L. Jackson) and her partner (Andy Garcia), as she tries to put the pieces together. But plagued by blackouts and her own disagreeable demeanor, Jessica begins suspect herself as the killer when the clues start pointing to her.

“Twisted” is a psychosexual thriller along the lines of the Joe Eszterhas screenplays that littered the 1990s film landscape (“Basic Instinct,” “Showgirls”). And much like those films, it’s an overheated, needlessly complex motion picture that eventually just gives up on itself. It doesn’t even cross over into shameful guilty pleasure country, like Eszterhas’s “Sliver” or “Jade.” “Twisted” is just a cleanly cut, old-fashioned bad movie.

Written by freshman Sarah Thorpe, “Twisted” opens with the sights and smells of a decent cop thriller, complete with a delicious mean streak trait that is shared by all the characters. The only real hero is Jessica, and she’s a law-bending, one-night-stand-loving officer of the people, who is also prone to excessive drinking and rough sex. You just don’t see that type of behavior from a lead character anymore. The director is Philip Kaufman, a filmmaker who knows a thing or two about kinky corners of sexuality (“Henry and June, “Quills”), as well as excessive film quality (“The Right Stuff”), and he seems a perfect choice to infuse “Twisted” with a creepy vibe of impending doom in both the homicide sense and in the sheets.

However, “Twisted” dies at almost the very moment it begins. Logic is a big tripwire, and the script sidesteps a lot of problems by having characters just disappear for no reason, or in Jessica’s case, simply blackout. The ending is also a jumble, containing a complete lack of sense, and it feels like the product of a screenwriter who was already two weeks late on delivering a draft and needed something quick. The entire film is poorly paced and awkwardly constructed, leaving little interest in the thriller proceedings that pop up occasionally to remind the audience what they came for.

Ashley Judd is another blunder of the film. I’ve liked Judd in the past, especially in her trademark thriller roles (“Double Jeopardy,” “High Crimes”), but she falters massively trying to bring Jessica to life. The appeal of the textured character is evident, but Judd can’t quite get a grip on the psychological complexity of the role, relying on a hard-ass approach that her elfish features betray. As Jessica’s world continues to dissolve and suspicions arise, Judd just gets worse, peaking with one scene that asks this hardened cop to open the floodgates of tears, unexpectedly eliciting big laughs in the process.

My rating: D-