FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| David Lean |||
David Lean

Honored with the American Film Institute Life Achievement Award in 1990, Lean’s body of work (ranging from the intimate film to the grandiose epic) demonstrates an obsessive cultivation of craft and a fastidious concern with detail that has become the very definition of quality British cinema.

Adapted from Noel Coward’s one-act play, Lean takes a potentially boring story of middle-age flirtation and tenderly creates one of the most enduring and poignant romance films ever made. Brilliantly underplayed, two happily married strangers meet by chance in a railway station and fall desperately in love, but never physically express the undercurrent of passion that exists between them, even during their final gut wrenching separation – if your heart doesn’t ache, you’re just not human!

Demonstrating moments of intimacy through gigantic display, Lean sets up the greatness of Pip’s expectations with the magnitude of his frightful encounters; one with an escaped convict, whose emerge into the frame reminds us what it’s like to be a child in a world of oversized, menacing adults, and another with the meeting of mad Miss Havisham, in all her gothic splendor.

Peter O'Toole made an enigmatic and lasting impression in his debut role as British officer T.E. Lawrence, who helped Arab rebels fight the Turks in WWI, and Omar Sharif has perhaps the greatest cinematic intro of all time as he magically appears through the ghostly waves of the desert heat, achieving Lean’s compulsive drive to create the perfectly composed shot. Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Jose Ferrer, and Claude Rains round out this incredibly talented and magnetically charged cast.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht



By BrianOrndorf

February 27th, 2004

The new serial killer/sex thriller “Twisted” recalls a day when Joe Eszterhas ruled the screenplay world. With its convoluted plotting, awful performances, and puzzler ending, “Twisted” had a clear shot at becoming a treasured guilty pleasure, but instead it’s just an old-fashioned bad time at the movies.

Jessica Shepard (Ashley Judd) is a San Francisco street cop who has just been promoted to detective. Her first case involves tracking a serial killer who has a peculiar choice of victim: ex-lovers involved with Jessica’s promiscuous and sexually violent lifestyle. Horrified, Jessica attempts to keep this information away from her mentor (Samuel L. Jackson) and her partner (Andy Garcia), as she tries to put the pieces together. But plagued by blackouts and her own disagreeable demeanor, Jessica begins suspect herself as the killer when the clues start pointing to her.

“Twisted” is a psychosexual thriller along the lines of the Joe Eszterhas screenplays that littered the 1990s film landscape (“Basic Instinct,” “Showgirls”). And much like those films, it’s an overheated, needlessly complex motion picture that eventually just gives up on itself. It doesn’t even cross over into shameful guilty pleasure country, like Eszterhas’s “Sliver” or “Jade.” “Twisted” is just a cleanly cut, old-fashioned bad movie.

Written by freshman Sarah Thorpe, “Twisted” opens with the sights and smells of a decent cop thriller, complete with a delicious mean streak trait that is shared by all the characters. The only real hero is Jessica, and she’s a law-bending, one-night-stand-loving officer of the people, who is also prone to excessive drinking and rough sex. You just don’t see that type of behavior from a lead character anymore. The director is Philip Kaufman, a filmmaker who knows a thing or two about kinky corners of sexuality (“Henry and June, “Quills”), as well as excessive film quality (“The Right Stuff”), and he seems a perfect choice to infuse “Twisted” with a creepy vibe of impending doom in both the homicide sense and in the sheets.

However, “Twisted” dies at almost the very moment it begins. Logic is a big tripwire, and the script sidesteps a lot of problems by having characters just disappear for no reason, or in Jessica’s case, simply blackout. The ending is also a jumble, containing a complete lack of sense, and it feels like the product of a screenwriter who was already two weeks late on delivering a draft and needed something quick. The entire film is poorly paced and awkwardly constructed, leaving little interest in the thriller proceedings that pop up occasionally to remind the audience what they came for.

Ashley Judd is another blunder of the film. I’ve liked Judd in the past, especially in her trademark thriller roles (“Double Jeopardy,” “High Crimes”), but she falters massively trying to bring Jessica to life. The appeal of the textured character is evident, but Judd can’t quite get a grip on the psychological complexity of the role, relying on a hard-ass approach that her elfish features betray. As Jessica’s world continues to dissolve and suspicions arise, Judd just gets worse, peaking with one scene that asks this hardened cop to open the floodgates of tears, unexpectedly eliciting big laughs in the process.

My rating: D-