FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Alfred Hitchcock |||
Alfred Hitchcock

This is perhaps an obvious choice, however, most people tend to overlook the Master of Suspense’s early work as well as the relevancy of his last film as a key element in the continuing transition and development of the genre he defined.

One of Hitchcock's early triumphs, this predecessor to the mistaken identity man on the run scenario Hitchcock turned to time and again, stars Robert Donat as the innocent wrongly accused of murder and pursued by both the police and enemy spies. This is the first example of Hitchcock’s mastery over the suspense tale, giving us a glimpse of the greatness to come.

Considered to be one of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest works, this story of two men who meet by chance on a train and frivolously discuss swapping murders is a prime example of a common Hitchcock theme of the man who suddenly finds himself within a nightmare world over which he has no control. You can easily see how this film lays the ground work for the more popular “North by Northwest”.

Alfred Hitchcock's final film is a light-hearted thriller involving phony psychics, kidnappers and organized religion, all of which cross paths in the search for a missing heir and a fortune in jewels. Here, Hitchcock has brilliantly developed his signature form to include the now common, and often overused, device of plot twist, after plot twist, after plot twist. Widescreen!

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Against the Ropes

By BrianOrndorf

February 19th, 2004

One of the first and most successful female boxing managers in the history of the sport, Jackie Kallen is a life that is ripe for a real cinematic exploration. “Against the Ropes” isn’t that film, but it is an entertaining enough sit, bolstered by a nice lead turn from Meg Ryan, and earnest direction from Charles Dutton.


Ever since she was a little girl, Jackie Kallen (Meg Ryan) has loved the world of boxing. Told time and again that she doesn’t belong, Jackie has kept herself in the fringes of the sport, working for men who don’t know half as much about the business as she does. When a vile boxing manager (Tony Shalhoub) offers the contract of a crackhead boxer to Jackie as a joke, she takes him up on the offer, finding her way to Luther Shaw (Omar Epps) in the process. A rough young urban drug dealer, it will take Kallen’s persistence and an aging trainer (Charles S. Dutton) to whip Shaw into shape and take on the establishment that wants nothing to do with Kallen or her fighter.

“Against the Ropes” is based on the life story of Jackie Kallen, one of the first and most successful female boxing managers in the history of the sport. And in true managerial style, Kallen managed to find herself with an executive producer credit on this film, thus restraining just how faithful this drama is to true events. The film claims to be “inspired” by Kallen’s tale, and I assume they mean that in the loosest possible way.

“Ropes” marks the feature film directorial debut of Charles S. Dutton, a hurricane of an actor who is also a lousy decision maker of material (the recent “Gothika“). Dutton is as passionate an actor as they make these days and, even in garbage, he has a way of bringing all the eyes to him. His enthusiasm shows clearly in “Ropes,” assembling a film that plays to both the upper and lower decks of the stadium seating. The script is written in a very crayola way, with characters outside of Kallen either saintly good or Beelzebubish evil and nothing in between. Dutton works around that the best that he can, and his ability to find nooks and crannies of genuine character in Kallen is a precious achievement, keeping the film from falling apart.

Dutton is assisted in building an interesting Kallen by Meg Ryan, who, after slogging through the rust colored mire of Jane Campion’s wild misfire, “In the Cut,” finds herself back on comfortable ground enjoying the luxury of using her charm again. Though Ryan is encumbered with a New England accent and a series of revealing outfits which threatens to “Erin Brockovich” the character to death, she’s able to make the disagreeable behavior of Kallen at least understandable. Kallen is an intelligent lady burdened by being a woman in a man’s world, and through Ryan’s portrayal, the audience is allowed to sense very palpable career and personal frustrations, even when the script heaps on the lothario caricatures and cigar-chomping mob types. This is a good performance from Ryan.

Though the film isn’t structured to support the big boxing match that must climax the piece, Dutton goes for the throat by staging one. What began as a portrait of a young woman’s rise to success eventually dissolves into an umpteenth “Rocky” knockoff, and loses integrity points in the process. Kallen is the main focus here, sanitized or not, and when her story is sidelined for a clichéd sports flick ending, “Against the Ropes” goes down for the count.

My rating: C+