FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| John Ford |||
John Ford

One of the art form's grand masters of all time, Ford is responsible for influencing the seminal directors of generation after generation. Strongly associated with the impressive body of work created over a lifetime with collaborator John Wayne, it is nearly impossible to choose just three… but here it goes.

This powerful winner of the Best Picture Academy Award is set in Wales at the turn of the 19th century, and tells the story of a family of miners, whose lives are filled with danger and repression. The film is beautifully crafted, lovingly depicting the gut wrenching sacrifices and light-hearted moments that are elemental to family life, making this film a true representation of the craft that is unmistakably John Ford.

This film is told in flashback as James Stewart, after a long absence, returns home for the funeral of a friend who saved his life from a sadistic outlaw. This classic covers every essential element required to qualify as a western epic from unlikely friends to the girl who comes between them, to the enemy they both despise, but handle with extremely different approaches, to Fords signature cast of supporting characters, all combine to make this a staple for every fan of this uniquely American genre.

This romantic comedy seen through the eyes of John Ford has John Wayne ( an American-raised boxer) go to Ireland to the village of his birth, fall for feisty Maureen O'Hara, and fight with town ruffian Victor McLaglen in one of the all time classic screen brawls. This is an exceptionally fine romantic movie that with Ford’s capable bravado manages to be a film that any man’s man can openly enjoy.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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Life Itself

By EdwardHavens

June 30th, 2014

Steve James’ touching new film about the late Roger Ebert is one of the hardest films to write about. Practically everyone who has been doing this sort of thing for the past thirty years or so owes the man an astonishing duty of appreciation, and many of us may have never considered attempting it had we not seen him and his success.

Life Itself

His passing was particularly painful, and to watch a movie whose substantively sad ending is still so fresh in our collective consciences was heartbreaking at many times.

Yet, even though we know how this is all going to end, “Life Itself” is ultimately life-affirming, with Roger reminding us how to find the joy in our daily grind even under the most disagreeable circumstances. Roger loved life. He loved his life, he loved his wife, he loved his children and grandchildren, and he loved movies. He even found a way to love his long time rival and “At the Movies” co-host Gene Siskel. It is through his love that we can accept his passing at the end, and it is through his love that we hurt all that much more from that passing.

Love is a major theme in “Life Itself.” Even when the camera is focused on something hard to watch, such as how Ebert was fed without a chin, it is clear the documentarian loves his subject. It is clear that many of the people who are called on to speak about the man genuinely love him, from his friends during his early years of his career and the filmmakers whose careers got a major boost thanks to a “Thumbs Up” from him to the every day film fan who never got the chance to meet him but were affected by his opinions. (It is also a sign of love that there is nary an image or mention of his signature show after the passing of Siskel.)

I’m sorry that this isn’t much of a traditional review. It’s been a hard time writing this, for there is not a single false note in the entire production. We get to learn more about Roger Ebert, the good and not so good, presented in a mostly linearly fashion with the occasional well-timed revisit to the relative-present. Excellent questions are asked (like why exactly did the presumably high-minded Ebert write a screenplay for a B-level sexploitation movie with Russ Meyer?) and answered, low points are balanced with high, and we are left with the sense of better understanding this mythic figure who was an important part of so many people’s lives for so many years. It does exactly what a documentary film should do: it informs, it touches your emotions and it does so in an entertaining fashion.

Ebert once called James’ 1994 documentary “Hoop Dreams” “one of the best films about American life that I have ever seen.” I find myself borrowing from Ebert to call “Life Itself” one of the best films about an American life I could ever see.

My rating: A+