FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Stanley Kubrick |||
Stanley Kubrick

A filmmaker of international importance, Kubrick was one of the only directors to work within the Studio System and still have full artistic control over his films from scripting through post-production, prompting Time Magazine to compare Kubrick’s early independence with the magnitude of Orson Welles.

An uncompromising antiwar film, this gut-wrenching drama depicts a World War I officer as he labors with an ultimately futile defense for three painfully sympathetic men tried for cowardice. Kubrick artistically utilizes a beautifully washed-out black and white photography to represent the muddied boundaries of right and wrong, and the many gray areas that lay between.

A fabulous and inspiring adventure, this visually stunning epic stars Kirk Douglas as the heroic slave who fights to lead his people to freedom from Roman rule. Although a clear departure from Kubrick’s oeuvre, “Spartacus” is an all time classic helmed by a man with a precise vision who is equally capable of crafting colossal spectacle, tense tête-à-têtes, and a tender moment between lovers.

This film is so stylish it’s easy to forget it’s a horror film at heart. Considered to be the thinking man’s thriller, Kubrick molds this very particularly “Stephan King” material into the portfolio of his films about human failure, as the hero’s desperate desire to become somebody ends in frustration and tragedy.

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Up (DVD)

By EdwardHavens

November 20th, 2009

When you think about it, it's a brilliant gambit. Release one of the best movies of the year in a package that combines a two Blu-Ray discs chock full of goodies one would normally get in a two disc DVD set with a single DVD that only has a few choice bonus features, and hope the consumer will jump for the new format once and for all.

Up (DVD)

I have to admit, it’s got me seriously thinking about making the switch to Blu-Ray, and I’m one of those people still stubbornly holding on to their HD-DVD player and titles. I see the back of the package and see all those Blu-Ray exclusive bonus features, and I see Blu-Ray machines with built-in Netflix streaming priced under $200 and I’m tempted to pull the trigger even before Black Friday. But alas, this is a review of the DVD, since I haven’t pulled the trigger on Blu-Ray just yet.

”Up” tells the story of recently widowed Carl Fredricksen, a former balloon salesman who has an amazing adventure with a Wilderness Scout in the wilds of South America, as he tries to live up to a promise made to his late wife many years before. By now, with the movie becoming one of the company’s greatest successes, many of us are familiar with the story, and how it continues Pixar’s incredible streak of great movie experiences. Whether watched on a computer screen or widescreen television, the computer-animated movie has a wealth of vibrant colors, textured grays and blacks and absolutely no noticeable artifacting. Both the Dolby Digital 5.1 and 2.0 sound mixes are rich in tone, making even the deliberately scratchy soundtrack for the film’s early newsreel footage sound fresh and energetic. The picture also looked and sounded good on an older U2 iPod, transferred as part of the set’s fourth disc, but much of the movie’s exquisite detail is lost on its two and a half inch screen. Personally, I lament this new trend of getting a new generation of moviegoers accepting watching in this fashion, and I hope this craze quickly fades away.

Like all Disney discs, we start off with a number of trailers and commercials. This time, we are treated to “Toy Story 3” and “The Princess and the Frog” theatrical teaser trailers, and a trailer for the direct-to-video “Santa Buddies.” Special features on the DVD include the “Partly Cloudy” short that played with “Up” in theatres, the fascinating “Adventure is Out There,” a twenty-two minute journey by the filmmakers to the real Paradise Falls, a five-minute discussion from director Pete Docter describing the many endings of Muntz pondered before the one that ended up in the movie, an exhaustively detailed feature commentary by director Pete Docter and co-director Bob Petersen, a one-minute how-to video showing people how they can use the enclosed digital copy to load the movie on to their portable media devices, and a new short for the DVD featuring the movie’s “talking” canines. “Dug’s Special Mission” is part of a new Pixar trend of creating a side short that dovetails into the original film, following Dug during his day leading up to his meeting Carl and Russell. It’s mildly amusing as we watch Dug inadvertently foil Alpha’s attempts to catch the bird, but it’s far below the high bar set by Pixar with previous shorts. Additionally, the DVD features a plethora of commercials for other Disney items, including “Ponyo,” the 70th Anniversary Release of “Dumbo,” and their Disney Movie Rewards program, which offers consumers the chance to get Disney items for buying Disney DVDs and going to see their movies in theatres.

Knowing how to cover all the bases, Disney is also releasing “Up” as a single DVD with the film and the two shorts, and a two-disc DVD set with some of the bonus features. But if you are thinking about switching to Blu-Ray someday, the Blu-Ray/DVD combo set might be the best bet, since you can enjoy the movie now and not have to buy the disk again when you eventually convert.

Final ratings:
The Movie: A
Picture Quality: A
Sound Quality: A
Bonus Features: A for all DVD bonus features, except “Dug’s Special Mission” (B-)
Overall Value: A-

My rating: A