FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| David Lean |||
David Lean

Honored with the American Film Institute Life Achievement Award in 1990, Lean’s body of work (ranging from the intimate film to the grandiose epic) demonstrates an obsessive cultivation of craft and a fastidious concern with detail that has become the very definition of quality British cinema.

Adapted from Noel Coward’s one-act play, Lean takes a potentially boring story of middle-age flirtation and tenderly creates one of the most enduring and poignant romance films ever made. Brilliantly underplayed, two happily married strangers meet by chance in a railway station and fall desperately in love, but never physically express the undercurrent of passion that exists between them, even during their final gut wrenching separation – if your heart doesn’t ache, you’re just not human!

Demonstrating moments of intimacy through gigantic display, Lean sets up the greatness of Pip’s expectations with the magnitude of his frightful encounters; one with an escaped convict, whose emerge into the frame reminds us what it’s like to be a child in a world of oversized, menacing adults, and another with the meeting of mad Miss Havisham, in all her gothic splendor.

Peter O'Toole made an enigmatic and lasting impression in his debut role as British officer T.E. Lawrence, who helped Arab rebels fight the Turks in WWI, and Omar Sharif has perhaps the greatest cinematic intro of all time as he magically appears through the ghostly waves of the desert heat, achieving Lean’s compulsive drive to create the perfectly composed shot. Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Jose Ferrer, and Claude Rains round out this incredibly talented and magnetically charged cast.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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A Thousand Years of Good Prayers

By BrianOrndorf

November 6th, 2008

"A Thousand Years of Good Prayers" is a lovely film of small intentions, yet embellished with an enormous heart. It's a story of a father and a daughter forced to confront their mounting personal unease, yet the picture is far more interested in the mechanics of dialogue, and how interaction with fellow human beings can fill the nagging holes in the soul.

A Thousand Years of Good Prayers

Arriving in Spokane, Washington from Beijing to visit his daughter Yilan (Feihong Yu), elderly Mr. Shi (Henry O) is looking forward to working on his English and getting a better idea of why his daughter experienced a failed marriage. Once settled, it becomes clear that Yilan is hoping to avoid her father as much as possible, leaving Mr. Shi wandering around the neighborhood, striking up friendships with fellow adults of various cultural backgrounds. Trying to deduce just what’s ailing his child, Mr. Shi finds Yilan’s tolerant life challenges his customs, forcing him to reconsider his own mistakes to best appreciate Yilan’s.

Shot with HD cameras under the direction of Wayne Wang (with a script adapted from Yiyun Li’s short story), “Prayers” is a character piece that humanely probes into the conflicts of a father and daughter divided by cultural perception and wilted emotional exchanges. It’s a poetic film, quite satisfied with extended takes of observation, assuming the perspective of Mr. Shi as he ventures out into the strange land of suburbia greeting strangers with hopes to better relate to his daughter. Wang appreciates the stillness of Mr. Shi, using his reserved manner to contrast against the coarse politeness of the America he encounters, finding some light comedic moments to counteract what is a somber tone for the picture.

Just watching O’s performance is enough to allow “Prayers” to make a lasting impression. O’s work merges contemplative thought with social curiosity into a luxurious character who peers out from behind his years at a democratic land that confuses him, yet enchants him completely. While the Yilan subplot is where “Prayers” is ultimately headed, Wang makes time for Mr. Shi to have his adventures, most notably in the company of a similarly-aged Iranian woman who communicates with Mr. Shi through broken English and a shared history of political oppression. These moments capture the passion Wang is hoping for, sitting down with two lonely people and hearing their fracture enthusiasm for conversation and company. The film shines brightest when emphasizing these misplaced souls.

The payoff of Yilan’s distance is a complicated issue that fits uncomfortably with the rest of the movie dramatically, yet fulfills thematic requirements appropriately. Watching Mr. Shi and Yilan come to terms with their dysfunction isn’t easy to watch, and Wang treats the emotional frost with surprising reality, concluding “Prayers” on a mournful, yet accurate note of matured familial contentment.

My rating: B+