FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| John Ford |||
John Ford

One of the art form's grand masters of all time, Ford is responsible for influencing the seminal directors of generation after generation. Strongly associated with the impressive body of work created over a lifetime with collaborator John Wayne, it is nearly impossible to choose just three… but here it goes.

This powerful winner of the Best Picture Academy Award is set in Wales at the turn of the 19th century, and tells the story of a family of miners, whose lives are filled with danger and repression. The film is beautifully crafted, lovingly depicting the gut wrenching sacrifices and light-hearted moments that are elemental to family life, making this film a true representation of the craft that is unmistakably John Ford.

This film is told in flashback as James Stewart, after a long absence, returns home for the funeral of a friend who saved his life from a sadistic outlaw. This classic covers every essential element required to qualify as a western epic from unlikely friends to the girl who comes between them, to the enemy they both despise, but handle with extremely different approaches, to Fords signature cast of supporting characters, all combine to make this a staple for every fan of this uniquely American genre.

This romantic comedy seen through the eyes of John Ford has John Wayne ( an American-raised boxer) go to Ireland to the village of his birth, fall for feisty Maureen O'Hara, and fight with town ruffian Victor McLaglen in one of the all time classic screen brawls. This is an exceptionally fine romantic movie that with Ford’s capable bravado manages to be a film that any man’s man can openly enjoy.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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Quid Pro Quo

By BrianOrndorf

June 12th, 2008

Though it plays like a diluted version of David Cronenberg's "Crash," "Quid Pro Quo" impressively maintains a bewildering mood, probing into an underbelly of cracked minds and disturbing matters of desire. It frustratingly refuses to go bonkers, but the film is a compelling sit, brought to life by two very crafty, pointed performances.

Quid Pro Quo

Partially paralyzed since he was eight years old, Isaac (Nick Stahl) has made a name for himself reporting for a New York public radio station. When an anonymous e-mailer sends in a tip for a story, Isaac follows the clue to an underground support group where members share and demonstrate their desire to live life as disabled people. Baffled, yet utterly intrigued, Isaac’s attention is soon consumed with able-bodied Fiona (Vera Farmiga), a member of the group who probes Isaac for information about life in a wheelchair. The two embark on a sexual relationship, but the glow is quickly rubbed off when Fiona shares her twisted plan to join Isaac in paralysis.

“Quid Pro Quo” is a strange movie that should’ve been stranger. Writer/director Carlos Brooks arranges a familiar noir tone for his debut feature film, treating Isaac as a Sam Spade type who chases temptation with little regard for his own well being. It’s a fixated character, hoping to fashion a breathtaking piece of journalism that will rocket him to public radio stardom, only to find that his subject, Fiona, sternly challenges his own perceptions to a life-altering degree.

Encountering disabled fetishes, “Quid Pro Quo” really has the clearance to head in any direction it chooses, presenting the opportunity for Brooks to launch off into seriously depraved regions of thrillerdom as Fiona starts to shed layers of stability. “Quid” nails the early scenes of uncomfortable discovery marvelously, promising a lurid decent into unspeakable desires and stomach-churning results.

It comes as some surprise that Books doesn’t want to make a film of questionable taste, but a mild psychological study buttoned with a faint, effective plot twist. Part of me wanted to throw my hands up in disgust, while the rest of me felt OK with the unexpected trajectory. Books has some interesting visual cues in “Quid,” but his strength is with the actors, guiding Stahl and Farmiga through tricky scenes of sensuality and mental instability. The performances are brave and eyes-wide-open, finding the glue that holds the movie together when the script stumbles to take it all in.

Isaac makes some life-altering discoveries and Fiona is buried alive in her guilt for the final act of “Quid,” and while nothing ever jumps off the screen, the resolution for this odd character piece is comforting, perhaps even ultimately perfect. “Quid Pro Quo” seems better suited to the stage, where static theatricality might emphasize the horror within, but the film remains an engrossing offering of oddness, even when it treats insanity as the ultimate cootie.

My rating: B