FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| John Sturges |||
John Sturges

Helming the “Magnificent Seven” should be reason enough, demonstrating that Sturges had the happy talent of taking what was considered strictly “male” oriented stories and making them sexy enough and humorous enough to appeal to female movie-goer as well.

Sturges takes this star-studded gunslinger film based on the Japanese favorite "The Seven Samurai", and makes it a bone fide all-American classic featuring Yul Brynner. At the request of Mexican peasants, Brynner recruits a band of fellow mercenaries, half of whom Sturges introduces as the next generation of action film super-stars including Charles Bronson, James Coburn, and Steve McQueen. Widescreen!

Sturges is responsible for what is renowned as one of the greatest war films ever made, featuring Steve McQueen and his unforgettably daring motorcycle jumps in the face of the enemy. Allied prisoners escape from a German POW camp in this superior effort, noted for a brilliant international cast and Elmer Bernstein's triumphant score. Widescreen!

This day in the life of a stranger in an isolated town has since been done to death, and this is why. In the hands of a lesser director the talents of this exceedingly manly cast (Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan) would otherwise overwhelm this compelling drama with a prejudice theme, but Sturges is able to maintain a firm grasp of the reigns, keeping his actors this side of mellow drama. Widescreen!

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Mon Idole

By EdwardHavens

July 5th, 2003

One of the most often asked questions in cinema is what one would do if they were given the chance to have everything they always wanted, if they were just willing to sacrifice some kind of moral price. In his feature directing debut entitled "Mon Idole,” French actor Guillaume Canet, best known to American audiences for his costarring role in “The Beach,” mostly plays it safe in answering this question. Most viewers will probably be able to answer the questions themselves before the end of the opening credits, and figure out the fate of the major players by the start of reel two. A minor film upon its release in its native France last Christmas, the film is still without an American distributor a year after its completion. If there will ever be any interest generated for “Mon Idole” in the future, it will be due to the newfound success of model turned actress Diane Kruger, also known as Mrs. Guillaume Canet, should her turn as Helen of Troy in the upcoming Trojan War epic “Troy,” starring Brad Pitt and Eric Bana, bring her the same stardom recently propelled on Monica Bellucci.


The focus of “Mon Idole” is on Bastien (Canet), a lowly technician on “Take Out the Tissues,” one of the top shows on French TV. Bastien also works as the assistant to Phillipe Letzger (Philippe Lefèbvre), the bastard child of Oprah Winfrey and Morton Downey Jr. host of “Tissues,” regularly finding himself humiliated by his boss, if only to allow himself access to his idol, the show’s legendary producer Jean-Louis Broustal (François Berléand). After work one Friday afternoon, Broustal invites Bastien out to his home in the country to discuss the concept for a new show Bastien recently pitched to Broustal. The pair arrives at the resplendently designed country home, where Bastien is introduced to Clara (Kruger), Broustal’s sexy young wife, who takes hospitality to new levels. Thus, the wheels are set in motion for Bastien’s temptation. Broustal will give the young lad the chance to host the new show, if only Bastien will agree to a unique personal services contract. When Bastien declines to participate, he finds himself not only out of a job but on the run for his life.

If there is anything remotely interesting concerning “Mon Idole,” besides the lovely Ms. Kruger, is the lengths director/co-writer/star Canet allowed his character to be shamed. Very few American stars would ever allow these kinds of moral degradations to be foisted upon them, let alone create them to be done to themselves, so Canet must be applauded for that. However, the bulk of the film is an uninteresting mess. As a satire on the reality television craze, it comes nowhere near the absurdity of most shows on the air, making its condemnation worthless in comparison. As a statement on the lack of morality in the entertainment industry, it pales in comparison to the savage beatings given by the likes of Paddy Chayefsky and Woody Allen. And as a first time director, Canet shows no kind of personal style that helped give neophyte directors like Quentin Tarantino and Paul Thomas Anderson a fan base through their debuts.

I give “Mon Idole” a C for effort and a D for execution.

"Mon Idole" Scorecard
Director: Guillaume Canet
Writers: Guillaume Canet, Philippe Lefèbvre
Producer: Alain Attal
Cinematography: Christophe Offenstein
Featuring: François Berléand, Guillaume Canet, Diane Kruger, Philippe Lefèbvre
MPAA Rating: Not rated by the MPAA
Running Time: 110 minutes
Aspect Ratio: Flat (1.85:1)
Sound Format: Dolby Digital, DTS

My rating: D