FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Alfred Hitchcock |||
Alfred Hitchcock

This is perhaps an obvious choice, however, most people tend to overlook the Master of Suspense’s early work as well as the relevancy of his last film as a key element in the continuing transition and development of the genre he defined.

One of Hitchcock's early triumphs, this predecessor to the mistaken identity man on the run scenario Hitchcock turned to time and again, stars Robert Donat as the innocent wrongly accused of murder and pursued by both the police and enemy spies. This is the first example of Hitchcock’s mastery over the suspense tale, giving us a glimpse of the greatness to come.

Considered to be one of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest works, this story of two men who meet by chance on a train and frivolously discuss swapping murders is a prime example of a common Hitchcock theme of the man who suddenly finds himself within a nightmare world over which he has no control. You can easily see how this film lays the ground work for the more popular “North by Northwest”.

Alfred Hitchcock's final film is a light-hearted thriller involving phony psychics, kidnappers and organized religion, all of which cross paths in the search for a missing heir and a fortune in jewels. Here, Hitchcock has brilliantly developed his signature form to include the now common, and often overused, device of plot twist, after plot twist, after plot twist. Widescreen!

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

Advertisement

Your Mommy Kills Animals

By BrianOrndorf

June 8th, 2007

You can hurl the murder, poverty, and injustice of humanity in the faces of millions, but nothing seems to rile the masses like the plight of animals. Those helpless little creatures tend to get the short end of the justice stick, battling cruelty on a routine basis. It's enough to make you want to scream...or firebomb an animal testing location?

Your Mommy Kills Animals

“Your Mommy Kills Animals” is a documentary probing this prickly issue, looking at the insular world of the animal rights activist and their kryptonite: the passionless, deliberate thinker. It’s unquestionably a flaming hot-button issue for a film to cover and one that necessitates a full-bodied level of patience with both sides of the argument. Of course that argument seems to be: animal activists - are they out of their damn gourd?

Director Curt Johnson, in a stance of directorial bravery that is seldom showcased, doesn’t appear to be taking a side towards either extreme, keeping a level head while he wades into these tumultuous waters. While no documentary can be completely objective, “Mommy” holds its ground impressively trying to tenderly extract points from both sides of the argument. With a subject that holds as much venom as this one does, “Mommy” remains amazingly poised.

The war waged in the film is one between the radical animal rights groups and those who live to reveal the hypocrisy of their actions, or at the very least pinpoint the danger of fighting fire with fire. “Mommy” details the rise of the Animal Liberation Front (ALF) and the ivory tower of the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), but it pays special attention to the Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (SHAC) collective.

A band of brothers dedicated to shutting down the Huntingdon Life Sciences Corporation by radical means, the group is underlined because they are one of the first to be tried for their actions under U.S. terrorism laws. Of course, it bewilders this group of unwashed twentysomething hipsters how they could be considered in the same league as Osama bin Laden, and “Mommy” splurges on an enormous amount of screentime trying to sell the absurd point that the U.S. Government considers animal activists to be the number one terrorist threat to America; however, there are several moments in the film where that branding seems completely justified.

Johnson isn’t interested in a simple smear campaign; that would be too easy. The general make-up of the average animal “defender” is young, low on smarts, and ready for an obscene amount of troublemaking. The affiliations give them a purpose, and all too often, their actions swerve into violence (the aforementioned firebombing is a popular choice) and reactionary tactics that fail to further the cause; often burying the purpose under charred remains of foolish execution.

“Mommy” does focus on these passionate pirates for Poopsie, but comments are also made by the older, rational animal advocates, who have insightful arguments and potent theories behind their passions. It was a blast of cool air on a hot summer day to hear coherent folk express themselves instead of scream obscenities and cowardly play the misdemeanor game. On the flip side, incisive arguments against the groups are made by equally composed individuals, though it’s revealed some may be swinging from the governmental teat. A shame, but a reality.

“Mommy” skips through the fields of ridiculous celebrity endorsements for animal groups, the eternal debate on fur, political motivations, and the effect the groups are having on these testing facilities. One of the better tangents centers on the fallacy of PETA and the Humane Society – two groups who have made it their mission to pimp lies for maximum profit and publicity.

To keep potential viewers aware, “Mommy” contains some footage of animal abuse and assorted cruelties. It isn’t incredibly graphic like a PETA video, but there’s enough to disturb. I’ve seen people tear up when a dog is simply scolded for bad behavior, so it’s best some viewers know what they’re getting themselves into. Thankfully, Johnson uses the footage to strengthen his points, not just adding them for shock value.

“Mommy” is a difficult movie to watch, but an important one to consider. If the production can’t quite find the bloodied core of the issue, it conveys the climate exceedingly well, conjuring fury, pity, and befuddlement often in the same instant. When it comes to creatures of nature, it’s a slippery slope, yet “Your Mommy Kills Animals” informs and entertains in the face of unimaginable stupidity and horror. If you give a damn about animals, this is a documentary you shouldn’t miss.

My rating: B+