FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| David Lean |||
David Lean

Honored with the American Film Institute Life Achievement Award in 1990, Leanís body of work (ranging from the intimate film to the grandiose epic) demonstrates an obsessive cultivation of craft and a fastidious concern with detail that has become the very definition of quality British cinema.

Adapted from Noel Cowardís one-act play, Lean takes a potentially boring story of middle-age flirtation and tenderly creates one of the most enduring and poignant romance films ever made. Brilliantly underplayed, two happily married strangers meet by chance in a railway station and fall desperately in love, but never physically express the undercurrent of passion that exists between them, even during their final gut wrenching separation Ė if your heart doesnít ache, youíre just not human!

Demonstrating moments of intimacy through gigantic display, Lean sets up the greatness of Pipís expectations with the magnitude of his frightful encounters; one with an escaped convict, whose emerge into the frame reminds us what itís like to be a child in a world of oversized, menacing adults, and another with the meeting of mad Miss Havisham, in all her gothic splendor.

Peter O'Toole made an enigmatic and lasting impression in his debut role as British officer T.E. Lawrence, who helped Arab rebels fight the Turks in WWI, and Omar Sharif has perhaps the greatest cinematic intro of all time as he magically appears through the ghostly waves of the desert heat, achieving Leanís compulsive drive to create the perfectly composed shot. Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Jose Ferrer, and Claude Rains round out this incredibly talented and magnetically charged cast.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

Advertisement

Oscar Handicap 2014: Leading Actor and Actress

By EdwardHavens

March 1st, 2014

Here, we will examine the results of voting patters for Best Actor and Best Actress.

Oscar Handicap 2014: Leading Actor and Actress

(For explanations as to how our scoring system works, make sure to read our first article in the series, Best Picture of the Year, linked at the bottom of this article.)

Best Actor

The Breakdowns
1) As long as you're not the nominee in the lowest grossing film in this category at the time of the nomination announcements, you've won 32 of 35 (91.43%). Advantage: Bale, DiCaprio, Ejiofor, McConaughey
2) As long as you're not the youngest nominee, you've won 28 of 35 (80%). Advantage: Bale, Dern, DiCaprio, McConaughey
3) The SAG Award winner in this category has gone on to win the Oscar in the same category 15 of the 19 times the former award has been awarded (78.95%). Advantage: McConaughey
4) Those who received the Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Drama have won the Best Actor Oscar 23 of 35 (65.71%). Advantage: McConaughey
5) Playing a fictional character has helped the winner 22 of 35 (62.86%). Advantage: Bale, Dern
6) Actors working from a screenplay adapted from a previously published work have won 20 of 35 (57.14%). Advantage: DiCaprio, Ejiofor
7) Those previously nominated for an Oscar have won the Best Actor Oscar 20 of 35 (57.14%). Advantage: bale, DiCaprio
8) The winner of at least two awards from four major critics organizations (Los Angeles Film Critics, National Board of Review, National Society of Film Critics, New York Film Critics Circle) has yielded an Oscar 18 of 35 (51.43%). Advantage: Dern

By The Numbers
Hopefully, an Oscar will convince Mr. McConaughey to stay far away from dumb rom-coms for the remainder of his career
Christian Bale, "American Hustle": +1, +2, -3, -4, +5, -6, +7, -8 (150 of 264, 56.82%)
Bruce Dern, "Nebraska": -1, +2, -3, -4, +5, -6, -7, +8 (117 of 264, 44.32%)
Leonardo DiCaprio, "The Wolf of Wall Street": +1, +2, -3, -4, -5, +6, +7, -8 (146 of 264, 55.30%)
Chiwetel Ejiofor, "12 Years a Slave": +1, -2, -3, -4, -5, +6, -7, -8 (120 of 264, 45.45%)
Matthew McConaughey, "Dallas Buyers Club": +1, +2, +3, +4, -5, -6, -7, -8 (158 of 264, 59.85%)

Best Actress

The Breakdowns
1) As long as you're not the nominee in the lowest grossing film in this category at the time of the nominations announcement, you've won 33 of the last 35 ceremonies (94.29%). Advantage: Adams, Blanchett, Bullock, Dench
2) The winner of the Golden Globe for Drama has gone to win here 28 of 35 (80%). Advantage: Blanchett
3) As long as you're not the youngest nominee, you've won 27 of 35 (77.14%). Advantage: Blanchett, Bullock, Dench, Streep
4) Playing an American has helped the winner in this category 26 of 35 (74.29%). Advantage: Adams, Blanchett, Bullock, Streep
5) Playing a fictional character has helped the winner 24 of 35 (68.57%). Advantage: Adams, Blanchett, Bullock, Streep
6) The SAG Award winner in this category has gone on to win the Oscar in the same category 13 of 19 (68.42%). Advantage: Blacnhett
7) The Best Actress winner has starred in a Best Picture nominee 23 of 35 (65.71%). Advantage: Adams, Bullock, Dench
8) First-time nominees in this category have won 18 of 35 (51.43%). Advantage: Adams
9) Actresses working from materials previously published or produced have won 18 of 35 (51.43%). Advantage: Dench, Streep

By The Numbers
Blanchett is the statistical leader, but sometimes forces outside the award show can cause a great upset
Amy Adams, "American Hustle": +1, -2, -3, +4, +5, -6, +7, +8, -9 (162 of 299, 54.18%)
Cate Blanchett, "Blue Jasmine": +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6, -7, -8, -9 (197 of 299, 65.89%)
Sandra Bullock, "Gravity": +1, -2, +3, +4, +5, -6, +7, -8, +9 (187 of 299, 62.54%)
Judi Dench, "Philomena": +1, -2, +3, -4, -5, -6, +7, -8, +9 (151 of 299, 50.50%)
Meryl Streep, "August: Osage County": -1, -2, +3, +4, +5, -6, -7, -8, +9 (142 of 299, 47.49%)


All articles in this series:
Best Picture of the Year
Best Director
Best Actor and Best Actress
Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress
Best Cinematography
Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay
Best Foreign Language Film
Best Animated Feature