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A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Henry Koster |||
Henry Koster

Although his name is not a household one, Koster is responsible for some of the most beloved and endearing films of the late studio system era.

This is a delightful comedy starring Cary Grant as a suave angel helping distraught bishop David Niven with a new cathedral and his wife's (Loretta Young) affections. This is a deftly handled comedy set within the religious world that never preaches, nor disrespects itís subject matter - and Cary Grant ice skates!

Another comedy slash drama with religious overtones, that doesnít stoop to pandering an opinion to its audience. Koster wisely allows this simple, but potently charming tale of two European nuns to unfold before our eyes as they come to New England and, guided by their faith and relentless determination, get a children's hospital built.

James Stewart stars as a good-hearted drunk whose constant companion is a six-foot, invisible rabbit named Harvey. In lesser, or heavier hands, this Broadway success may have suffered, but Koster allows Stewarts natural charm and audience appeal to be the fuel that runs this whacky engine.

Recommended by CarrieSpecht

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Oscar Handicap 2014: Cinematography

By EdwardHavens

March 1st, 2014

For this article, we will examine how the directors of photography stack up against each other.

Oscar Handicap 2014: Cinematography

(For explanations as to how our scoring system works, make sure to read our first article in the series, Best Picture of the Year, linked at the bottom of this article.) The discipline of making lighting and camera choices when recording photographic images, the Cinematographer works with the director to decide the overall look of the film. Purists have lamented the rise of digital intermediate technology, where the director and cinematographer can fine-tune the look of individual scenes and even single frames by computer, is quickly killing the fine art of cinematography, but until the Academy creates a Best DI category, this is what we'll have to deal with.

The Breakdowns
1) Oscar winning cinematography has come from lensers also nominated for the same award at the BAFTAs 31 of the last 35 ceremonies (88.57%). Advantage: Delbonnel, Lubezki, Papamichael
2) Shooters of stories predominantly set outside the past twenty years have won 30 of 35 (85.71%). Advantage: Delbonnel, Le Sourd
3) As long as you're not the nominee in the lowest grossing film at the time of the nominations, you've won 29 of 35 (82.86%). Advantage: Deakins, Delbonnel, Lubezki, Papamichael
4) Cinematography winners have come from films whose directors have also been nominated 28 of 35 (80%). Advantage: Lubezki, Papamichael
5) Cinematography awards have been given to films also nominated for Best Achievement in Production Design 27 of 35 (77.14%). Advantage: Lubezki
6) Winners here have come from Best Picture nominees 27 of 35 (77.14%). Advantage: Lubezki, Papamichael
7) A previous nominee for Best Cinematography has gone on to win 20 of 35 (57.14%). Advantage: Deakins, Delbonnel, Lubezki
8) The winner of the Best Cinematography Award from the American Society of Cinematographers has won here 10 of the 27 years the ASC has given out awards (37.04%). Disadvantage: Lubezki

By The Numbers
Lubezki's work in helping to create zero-gravity will likely win here, while eleven-time nominee Deakins, inarguably the greatest living cinematographer, will once again go home empty handed.
Roger Deakins, "Prisoners": -1, -2, +3, -4, -5, -6, +7, -8 (98 of 272, 36.03%)
Bruno Delbonnel, "Inside Llewyn Davis": +1, +2, +3, -4, -5, -6, +7, -8 (150 of 272, 55.15%)
Phillipe Le Sourd, "The Grandmaster": -1, +2, -3, -,4 -5, -6, -7, -8 (68 of 272, 25%)
Emmanuel Lubezki, "Gravity": +1, -2, +3, +4, +5, +6, +7, +8 (177 of 272, 65.07%)
Phedon Papamichael, "Nebraska": +1, -2, +3, +4, -5, +6, -7, -8 (116 of 272, 42.65%)


All articles in this series:
Best Picture of the Year
Best Director
Best Actor and Best Actress
Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress
Best Cinematography
Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay
Best Foreign Language Film
Best Animated Feature