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A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| John Sturges |||
John Sturges

Helming the “Magnificent Seven” should be reason enough, demonstrating that Sturges had the happy talent of taking what was considered strictly “male” oriented stories and making them sexy enough and humorous enough to appeal to female movie-goer as well.

Sturges takes this star-studded gunslinger film based on the Japanese favorite "The Seven Samurai", and makes it a bone fide all-American classic featuring Yul Brynner. At the request of Mexican peasants, Brynner recruits a band of fellow mercenaries, half of whom Sturges introduces as the next generation of action film super-stars including Charles Bronson, James Coburn, and Steve McQueen. Widescreen!

Sturges is responsible for what is renowned as one of the greatest war films ever made, featuring Steve McQueen and his unforgettably daring motorcycle jumps in the face of the enemy. Allied prisoners escape from a German POW camp in this superior effort, noted for a brilliant international cast and Elmer Bernstein's triumphant score. Widescreen!

This day in the life of a stranger in an isolated town has since been done to death, and this is why. In the hands of a lesser director the talents of this exceedingly manly cast (Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan) would otherwise overwhelm this compelling drama with a prejudice theme, but Sturges is able to maintain a firm grasp of the reigns, keeping his actors this side of mellow drama. Widescreen!

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Oscar Handicap 2014: Cinematography

By EdwardHavens

March 1st, 2014

For this article, we will examine how the directors of photography stack up against each other.

Oscar Handicap 2014: Cinematography

(For explanations as to how our scoring system works, make sure to read our first article in the series, Best Picture of the Year, linked at the bottom of this article.) The discipline of making lighting and camera choices when recording photographic images, the Cinematographer works with the director to decide the overall look of the film. Purists have lamented the rise of digital intermediate technology, where the director and cinematographer can fine-tune the look of individual scenes and even single frames by computer, is quickly killing the fine art of cinematography, but until the Academy creates a Best DI category, this is what we'll have to deal with.

The Breakdowns
1) Oscar winning cinematography has come from lensers also nominated for the same award at the BAFTAs 31 of the last 35 ceremonies (88.57%). Advantage: Delbonnel, Lubezki, Papamichael
2) Shooters of stories predominantly set outside the past twenty years have won 30 of 35 (85.71%). Advantage: Delbonnel, Le Sourd
3) As long as you're not the nominee in the lowest grossing film at the time of the nominations, you've won 29 of 35 (82.86%). Advantage: Deakins, Delbonnel, Lubezki, Papamichael
4) Cinematography winners have come from films whose directors have also been nominated 28 of 35 (80%). Advantage: Lubezki, Papamichael
5) Cinematography awards have been given to films also nominated for Best Achievement in Production Design 27 of 35 (77.14%). Advantage: Lubezki
6) Winners here have come from Best Picture nominees 27 of 35 (77.14%). Advantage: Lubezki, Papamichael
7) A previous nominee for Best Cinematography has gone on to win 20 of 35 (57.14%). Advantage: Deakins, Delbonnel, Lubezki
8) The winner of the Best Cinematography Award from the American Society of Cinematographers has won here 10 of the 27 years the ASC has given out awards (37.04%). Disadvantage: Lubezki

By The Numbers
Lubezki's work in helping to create zero-gravity will likely win here, while eleven-time nominee Deakins, inarguably the greatest living cinematographer, will once again go home empty handed.
Roger Deakins, "Prisoners": -1, -2, +3, -4, -5, -6, +7, -8 (98 of 272, 36.03%)
Bruno Delbonnel, "Inside Llewyn Davis": +1, +2, +3, -4, -5, -6, +7, -8 (150 of 272, 55.15%)
Phillipe Le Sourd, "The Grandmaster": -1, +2, -3, -,4 -5, -6, -7, -8 (68 of 272, 25%)
Emmanuel Lubezki, "Gravity": +1, -2, +3, +4, +5, +6, +7, +8 (177 of 272, 65.07%)
Phedon Papamichael, "Nebraska": +1, -2, +3, +4, -5, +6, -7, -8 (116 of 272, 42.65%)


All articles in this series:
Best Picture of the Year
Best Director
Best Actor and Best Actress
Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress
Best Cinematography
Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay
Best Foreign Language Film
Best Animated Feature