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A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Alfred Hitchcock |||
Alfred Hitchcock

This is perhaps an obvious choice, however, most people tend to overlook the Master of Suspense’s early work as well as the relevancy of his last film as a key element in the continuing transition and development of the genre he defined.

One of Hitchcock's early triumphs, this predecessor to the mistaken identity man on the run scenario Hitchcock turned to time and again, stars Robert Donat as the innocent wrongly accused of murder and pursued by both the police and enemy spies. This is the first example of Hitchcock’s mastery over the suspense tale, giving us a glimpse of the greatness to come.

Considered to be one of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest works, this story of two men who meet by chance on a train and frivolously discuss swapping murders is a prime example of a common Hitchcock theme of the man who suddenly finds himself within a nightmare world over which he has no control. You can easily see how this film lays the ground work for the more popular “North by Northwest”.

Alfred Hitchcock's final film is a light-hearted thriller involving phony psychics, kidnappers and organized religion, all of which cross paths in the search for a missing heir and a fortune in jewels. Here, Hitchcock has brilliantly developed his signature form to include the now common, and often overused, device of plot twist, after plot twist, after plot twist. Widescreen!

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Notes from the 2008 American Film Market

By EdwardHavens

November 6th, 2008

This year's American Film Market, where thousands of film buyers and sellers come together at Santa Monica's Loews Beach Hotel for a week of deal-making, networking and schmoozing, started yesterday, amongst worries the global economic crisis could make for less than desirable results.

Notes from the 2008 American Film Market

The veteran of numerous AFMs myself, I had never seen such a blasé opening frame as I witnessed yesterday. Usually, opening day at the Market is filled with heavy traffic in the halls and suites, buyers optimistic there will be a cache of new films that they can bring home to their entertainment-starved masses, sellers hoping this year will be better than the previous. On Wednesday, the mood was cautiously positive, with expectations riding on a major uptick in deals for the weekend, but it was still shocking to see the usually jam-packed Weinstein Company suite so threadbare, but it was like that in every suite.

Speaking of the Weinsteins, amongst the new product they were hawking was “Nine,” Rob Marshall’s cinematic adaptation of the Broadway musical which itself was an adaptation of Federico Fellini’s “8 1/2." Daniel Day-Lewis plays filmmaker Guido Contini, who finds himself entangled in a mid-life crisis as he approaches his fortieth birthday, despite celebrating his most recent and greatest success. You couldn’t ask for a better supporting cast, which includes Oscar-winners Marion Cotillard, Judi Dench, Nicole Kidman and Sophia Loren, as well as Penelope Cruz, Stacy Ferguson and Kate Hudson. The Weinsteins released this photo of the production, which only began three weeks ago. “Nine” is scheduled to open in theatres December 11, 2009.


”Nine” image courtesy The Weinstein Company

At AFM, The Weinstein Company also introduced new pictures for “Crossing Over,” Extreme Movie” and “Youth in Revolt.”



”Crossing Over” images courtesy The Weinstein Company




”Extreme Movie” images courtesy The Weinstein Company




”Youth in Revolt” images courtesy The Weinstein Company

”Extreme Movie” is scheduled to arrive in theatres on December 5, “Youth in Revolt” on February 20 and “Crossing Over” later in 2009.