FilmJerk Favorites

A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Stanley Kubrick |||
Stanley Kubrick

A filmmaker of international importance, Kubrick was one of the only directors to work within the Studio System and still have full artistic control over his films from scripting through post-production, prompting Time Magazine to compare Kubrick’s early independence with the magnitude of Orson Welles.

An uncompromising antiwar film, this gut-wrenching drama depicts a World War I officer as he labors with an ultimately futile defense for three painfully sympathetic men tried for cowardice. Kubrick artistically utilizes a beautifully washed-out black and white photography to represent the muddied boundaries of right and wrong, and the many gray areas that lay between.

A fabulous and inspiring adventure, this visually stunning epic stars Kirk Douglas as the heroic slave who fights to lead his people to freedom from Roman rule. Although a clear departure from Kubrick’s oeuvre, “Spartacus” is an all time classic helmed by a man with a precise vision who is equally capable of crafting colossal spectacle, tense tęte-ŕ-tętes, and a tender moment between lovers.

This film is so stylish it’s easy to forget it’s a horror film at heart. Considered to be the thinking man’s thriller, Kubrick molds this very particularly “Stephan King” material into the portfolio of his films about human failure, as the hero’s desperate desire to become somebody ends in frustration and tragedy.

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"Law & Order" Takes on The New York Times Scandal

By ChrisFaile

July 31st, 2003

Watch out: Television’s current longest-running drama takes on one of the nation’s oldest, and most prestigious, papers. In an episode that begins shooting today in New York City, NBC’s “Law & Order” is filming an installment mirroring the Jayson Blair scandal, which engulfed The New York Times and subsequently caused the ouster of its two top editors. This being “Law & Order,” though, the ripped-from-the-headlines episode will add a further twist, with the murder of a source by the reporter himself— all in order to keep the source from blowing the whistle to the paper’s top editors and to law enforcement.


According to FilmJerk.com sources, the episode – entitled “Bounty” – will focus on a black reporter named Brian Kellog, of the fictitious New York Tribune. Described as “likable, charismatic and intelligent,” the reporter publishes a highly-touted story about bookstore heir and fugitive rapist Mitchell Maas, which includes quotes from the on-the-lam perp. Maas later turns up dead— as does a bounty hunter trying to track him down. With Maas’ death, which has been ruled a homicide, Kellog can lay claim to having been the only reporter to have actually spoken to Maas. In the end, it turns out that the story was pure fabrication and that Kellog murdered Maas (who was on to the scam) after the rapist threatened to blow the whistle on Kellog.

Two of the other roles in the episode are seemingly based on real-life people: Wesley Schultz, the managing editor of the Tribune (shades of Gerald Boyd, who resigned June 5) and Sybil, Kellog’s secretary, the only person Kellog could not hide his true colors from (modeled after Zuza Glowacka, a member of the Times photo department, who was also Blair’s galpal).

Mark Jurkowitz of the Boston Globe recently called the Jayson Blair scandal “one of the biggest disasters in the paper's history.” Blair resigned from his post at the Times on May 1 after being accused of plagiarism and fraud for dozens of embellished stories.

The airdate of the episode is currently unknown. The new season of “Law & Order,” which will be its fourteenth, begins September 24.

It has been a busy week on news regarding the Times, with Bill Keller assuming the top role as executive editor yesterday, the announcement that the paper will add a “public editor” to serve as an ombudsman, and the elevation of two editors to the role of co-managing editors today. Also announced this week was that Blair would be writing a review of the film “Shattered Glass” for Esquire Magazine, which focuses on, appropriately enough, a disgraced journalist who fell from grace after fabricating parts of a story on anti-drug programs.

The Scorecard
Producers: Dick Wolf, Michael Chernuchin, Matthew Penn, Jeffrey Hayes and Kati Johnston
Director: Matthew Penn
Casting Director : Suzanne Ryan
Shoots: July 31 – August 11
Location: New York City
Production Company: Universal Network Television
Network: NBC