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A group of unique directors and the essential works that you've got to see.

||| Sergio Leone |||
Sergio Leone

Leone’s career is remarkable in its unrelenting attention to both American culture and the American genre film, exploring the mythic America he created with each successive film examining the established characters in greater depth.

Only his second feature (a remake of Kurosawa’s Yojimbo), Leone's landmark "spaghetti western" caused a revolution and features Clint Eastwood in his breakthrough role as "The Man With No Name". This classic brutal drama of feuding families wasn’t the first spaghetti Western, but it was far and away the most successful up to that time.

Plot is of minimal interest, but character is everything to Leone, who places immense meaning in the slightest flick of an eyelid, extensively using the extreme close-up on the eyes to reveal any feeling, as demonstrated by Clint, who squints his way through this slam-bang sequel to A Fistful of Dollars as a wandering gunslinger that must combine forces with his nemesis to track down a wanted killer.

The final chapter in the groundbreaking trilogy follows Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, and Eli Wallach as they form an uneasy alliance to find a stash of hidden gold. Leone focuses on his central theme as they find themselves facing greed, treachery, and murder, showing that the desire for wealth and power turns men into ruthless creatures who violate land and family and believe that a man’s death is less important than how he faces it.

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"Law & Order" Takes on The New York Times Scandal

By ChrisFaile

July 31st, 2003

Watch out: Television’s current longest-running drama takes on one of the nation’s oldest, and most prestigious, papers. In an episode that begins shooting today in New York City, NBC’s “Law & Order” is filming an installment mirroring the Jayson Blair scandal, which engulfed The New York Times and subsequently caused the ouster of its two top editors. This being “Law & Order,” though, the ripped-from-the-headlines episode will add a further twist, with the murder of a source by the reporter himself— all in order to keep the source from blowing the whistle to the paper’s top editors and to law enforcement.


According to FilmJerk.com sources, the episode – entitled “Bounty” – will focus on a black reporter named Brian Kellog, of the fictitious New York Tribune. Described as “likable, charismatic and intelligent,” the reporter publishes a highly-touted story about bookstore heir and fugitive rapist Mitchell Maas, which includes quotes from the on-the-lam perp. Maas later turns up dead— as does a bounty hunter trying to track him down. With Maas’ death, which has been ruled a homicide, Kellog can lay claim to having been the only reporter to have actually spoken to Maas. In the end, it turns out that the story was pure fabrication and that Kellog murdered Maas (who was on to the scam) after the rapist threatened to blow the whistle on Kellog.

Two of the other roles in the episode are seemingly based on real-life people: Wesley Schultz, the managing editor of the Tribune (shades of Gerald Boyd, who resigned June 5) and Sybil, Kellog’s secretary, the only person Kellog could not hide his true colors from (modeled after Zuza Glowacka, a member of the Times photo department, who was also Blair’s galpal).

Mark Jurkowitz of the Boston Globe recently called the Jayson Blair scandal “one of the biggest disasters in the paper's history.” Blair resigned from his post at the Times on May 1 after being accused of plagiarism and fraud for dozens of embellished stories.

The airdate of the episode is currently unknown. The new season of “Law & Order,” which will be its fourteenth, begins September 24.

It has been a busy week on news regarding the Times, with Bill Keller assuming the top role as executive editor yesterday, the announcement that the paper will add a “public editor” to serve as an ombudsman, and the elevation of two editors to the role of co-managing editors today. Also announced this week was that Blair would be writing a review of the film “Shattered Glass” for Esquire Magazine, which focuses on, appropriately enough, a disgraced journalist who fell from grace after fabricating parts of a story on anti-drug programs.

The Scorecard
Producers: Dick Wolf, Michael Chernuchin, Matthew Penn, Jeffrey Hayes and Kati Johnston
Director: Matthew Penn
Casting Director : Suzanne Ryan
Shoots: July 31 – August 11
Location: New York City
Production Company: Universal Network Television
Network: NBC