Movie Watch: The Bad Batch

The Bad Batch

It’s okay if you have not heard of Ana Lily Amirpour yet. She only has one movie released so far, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, a self-described “Iranian vampire Western” shot in Persian somewhere outside Buttonwillow (a favorite stop for travelers of Interstate 5 between Los Angeles and the Bay Area), which grossed less than a million dollars when it was released three years ago. But it should be a sign of how visionary her little movie was that her follow-up, The Bad Batch, should be able to land stars like Jason Momoa, Keanu Reeves, Diego Luna and Jim Carrey, and get financed by one of the best producers working today, Megan Ellison.

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The Hero

The Hero

Way out west, there was this fella I wanna tell ya about. Goes by the name of Sam Elliott. At least that was the handle his loving parents gave him, but many people, especially women – and not just older women but women of all ages with discerning tastes – would call him “The Sexiest Man Alive.” See, this Elliot, he’d never call himself “The Sexiest Man Alive.” Because boiling down one of the most interesting actors to grace the silver screen down to a worthless tabloid moniker doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. Watching Sam Elliott work over the past forty years, on the silver screen and on television, in a wide variety of genres, has been one of the great joys of entertainment, and never has he had a role quite like Lee Hayden, leading a movie quite like “The Hero.”

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2017 San Francisco International Film Festival Preview

Brimstone and Glory

One of the nation’s oldest film festivals is celebrating its diamond anniversary in 2017. The 60th annual San Francisco International Film Festival runs from April 5th to April 19th, featuring 191 dramatic narratives, documentaries, short films and special events. We’re highlighting 15 of the films we’re looking forward to checking out…

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A Different Sun

A Different Sun

I think I figured out why first time director Reed Tang’s “A Different Sun” feels so darned disjointed. How else can you describe a drama about a Chinese family who moves to Germany to help their daughter get a better education, which is mostly in English and almost exclusively shot in upstate New York?

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Rating: C-
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